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United States Department of State / Foreign relations of the United States, 1947. General; The United Nations
(1947)

United States interest in international economic collaboration for the expansion of world trade and employment: negotiations at Geneva leading to the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) and to the convening of the Havana conference,   pp. 909-1025 PDF (44.4 MB)


Page 909


UNITED STATES INTEREST IN INTERNATIONAL ECO-
  NOMIC COLLABORATION FOR THE EXPANSION OF
  WORLD TRADE AND EMPLOYMENT: ' NEGOTIATIONS
  AT GENEVA LEADING TO THE GENERAL AGREEMENT
  ON TARIFFS AND TRADE (GATT) AND TO THE CON-
  VENING OF THE HAVANA CONFERENCE
                        Editorial Note
  The First Session of the Preparatory Committee of the United Na-
tions Conference on Trade and Employment met in London from
October 15 to November 26, 1946. At that meeting the United States
draft Charter for an International Trade Organization was revised
and an attempt was made to reach agreement on a set of principles
which all could accept. Where there was an identity of view, the articles
of the Charter were assembled in a revised draft; where differences,
however, could not be reconciled, the conference report simply de-
scribed the different views that had been advanced.2 The First Session
laid the groundwork for an interim drafting committee, which met in
New York City in January 1947, and improved the language of those
articles where substantial agreement had been reached. The First Ses-
sion delegates selected April 8, 1947, as the date for convening the
Second Session of the Preparatory Committee.
  During the early part of 1947, considerable discussion took place
among representatives of the United States, Great Britain, and France
as to how the projected multilateral negotiations on tariffs could best
be accomplished. All agreed that because the United'States was pre-
pared to provide a number of negotiating groups, the talks could be
speeded up. Planning also involved deciding how delegations would
be staffed to handle various problems, some of which were matters of
policy formulation, while others involved special technical competence.
The United States urged that the tariff and Charter negotiations take
place simultaneously, but the British preferred that the former be
started at least a month before thelatter. Both countries agreed that
the principal policy officers ought to remain at Geneva throughout the
entire conference, to speed decisions.
'For previous documentation concerning this subject, see Foreign Relation8,
1946, vol. I, pp. 1263 ff.
2 Report of the First Session of the Preparatory Committee of the United
Na-
tions Conference on Trade and Employment (United Nations Doc. E/PC/T/33)
(London, 1946).
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