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United States Department of State / Foreign relations of the United States diplomatic papers, 1934. The American Republics
(1934)

Cuba,   pp. 93-188 PDF (33.6 MB)


Page 97


837.00/4596: Telegram
The Personal Representative of the President (Caffery) to the Acting
                        Secretary of State
                                 HABANA, January 11, 1934-7 p. m.
                                               [Received 10 p. m.]
  7. Next to the last paragraph my telegram No. 5, January 10, 7 p. m.
Last night I discussed the situation at some length informally with
Grau and Batista. After much hesitation Grau stated that to his
mind the important issue of the day is that of fair elections. He then
said in effect: "I believe that I can guarantee fair elections if I
remain
in the Presidency but if the opposition are convinced that I cannot do
so I will be willing to give place to a non-political successor to be
chosen by me from a panel of three names to be selected by the opposi-
tion on condition that one of the names at least must be acceptable to
me. I would be willing to consent to a division of the Cabinet between
ourselves and the opposition groups."
  I thought it best not to pursue this conversation further last night
in order to give Grau time to think this over and also because I am
not convinced . . . that he would be allowed to resign by his Cabinet
or the student leaders in the Palace. I shall wait for further news
from Grau.
837.00/4605: Telegram
The Personal Representative of the President (Caffery) to the Acting
                        Secretary of State
                                 HABANA, January 13,1934-5 p. m.
                                             [Received 8: 50 p. m.]
  9. My telegram No. 5, January 10, 7 p. m. and No. 7, January 11,
7 p. m. As the Department is aware it would be a hopeless task to get
all of the opposition groups to agree on a program: there are too
many differences of opinion among them: for instance the Mendieta
group is interested in elections while some of the other groups would
rather pin their faith in a revolution or the hope that we will intervene
and put them into power; in fact they are very indignant that we have
not done so. I have made no attempt at drawing the groups together
on a program.
  Batista asked me 3 days ago what we wanted done for recognition.
I said "I will lay down no specific terms; the matter of your govern-
ment is a Cuban matter and it is for you to decide what you will do
about it". (Having in mind our reiterated declarations as to our
position on recognition.)
97
CUJBA


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