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United States Department of State / Papers relating to the foreign relations of the United States, with the annual message of the president transmitted to Congress December 2, 1902
(1902)

Russia,   pp. 916-937 PDF (1.4 MB)


Page 932

 a Printed, ante, page 931. 932 FOREIGN RELATIONS. 
  If r. Tawer to Hr. Hay. 
 No. 552.] EMBASSY OF THE UNITED STATES, 
$t. Petersburg, lt(arch 22, 19093. 
 SIR: I have the honor to inclose to you herewith, for your information,
a copy of the declaration a of the 3d (16th) of March, made by Russia and
France in regard to the maintenance of the status quo in the Far East, as
the same was published in the official part of the Journal de St. PĂ©tersbourg
on Thursday, the 7th (' 20th) of March, 1902. 
 Although this declaration was officially communicated to the Government
of the United States by the representatives in Washington of the signatory
powers, its publication here was accompanied by a memorandum issued in regard
to it by the imperial Russian minister for foreign affairs, which may not
have accompanied the official communication of the declaration itself. I
forward this copy of it to you, therefore, because of its value in interpreting
the purposes of the declaration and also for the particularly interesting
confirmation which it contains of the statements of policy heretofore made
by Russia in regard to the open door in China. 
 This statement is that: 
 The principles which have guided the policy of Russia since the outbreak
of the disorders in China have always been and still are unchanged. Russia
insists upon the independence and the integrity of China, a neighboring and
friendly country, as well as upon those of Korea. Russia desires the maintenance
of the status quo and of the general peace in the Far East. By the construction
of the Great Siberian Railway, with its branch line through Manchuria to
a harbor always free from ice, Russia favors the extension within those regions
of the commerce and industry of the whole world. 
I have, etc., 
CHARLEMAGNE TOWER. 
{Inclosure.l 
From the Journal de St. Petersburg of Thursday, March 7 (20), 1902—Official.
ST. PETERSBURG, March 6, 1902. 
 The convention concluded in January last between England and Japan has given
rise to the most contradictory interpretations and to the most varied suppositions,
principally by reason of the fact that by that instrument two of the eleven
powers which had quite recently signed the Pekin protocol, after bringing
their collective action in China to an end, seemed to separate themselves
from the other cabinets and to place themselves in a special situation in
respect to the Celestial Empire, in which, thanks to the efforts of them
all, the traditional order of things had been reestablished and the legitimate
central authority had been restored. 
 The Imperial Government, having duly considered the friendly communications
sent to Russia by the Japanese and British Governments on this subject, viewed
the conclusion of the said arrangement with the utmost calmness. The principles
which have guided the policy of Russia since the beginning of the disorders
in China have remained, and still remain, unchanged. Russia insists upon
the independence and integrity of China, a friendly and neighboring country,
as it does upon those of Korea. Russia desires the maintenance of the status
quo and of general peace in the Far East. By the construction of the Great
Siberian Railway, with a branch line running through Manchuria to a port
which is at all times free from ice, Russia favors the extension of the commerce
and industry of the entire world in those regions. Would it be to her interest
to place obstacles in their way now? 
 The intention expressed by England and Japan to contribute to the attainment
of the objects which have invariably been had in view by the Russian Government
can not fail to meet with the sympathy of Russia in spite of the comments
which have 


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