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United States Department of State / Papers relating to the foreign relations of the United States, with the annual message of the president transmitted to Congress December 2, 1902
(1902)

Russia,   pp. 916-937 PDF (1.4 MB)


Page 931

 RUSSIA. 931 
Jlfemorandum handed to the Secretary of State lifarch 19, 1902. 
[Translation.] 
IMPERIAL EMBASSY OF RUSSIA IN WASHINGTON. 
 The allied Governments of Russia and France having received communication
of the Anglo-Japanese convention of January 30, 1902, concluded for the object
of assuring status quo and general peace in the Far East as well as of maintaining
the independence of China and Korea, which countries must remain open to
the commerce of all nations, have found therein, with full satisfaction,
the affirmation of the essential principles that they themselves have repeatedly
declared to be and remain the foundation of their policy. The two Governnients
consider the observance of those principles to be at the same time a guaranty
for their special interests in the Far East. Being, however, under the necessity
of taking into account, for their own part, the contingency of either the
aggressive action of third powers or renewed disturbances in China, by which
the integrity and free development of that power would be put in doubt, becoming
a menace, for their own interests the two allied Governments reserve to themselves
the right eventhally to devise suitable means to insure their protection.
ST. PETERSBURG, Hare/i 3 (16), 102. 
lifemorandum. 
DEPARTMENT OF STATE, 
Was/einqton, Hare/i 22, 1902. 
 The Government of the United States has pleasure in taking note of the declaration
of the allied Governments of Russia and France that, having received communication
of the Anglo-Japanese convention of January 30, 1902, which was concluded
for the purpose of assuring the status quo and general peace in the Far East
as well as maintaining the independence of China and Korea, which countries
should remain open to the commerce and industry of all nations, they have
found full satisfaction in seeing therein the affirmation of the essential
principles which they have themselves on repeated occasions declared to form
and continue to be the bases of their policy. 
 The Government of the United States is gratified to see in this declaration
of the allied Governments of Russia and France, as in the Anglo-Japanese
convention, renewed confirmation of the assurances it has heretofore received
from each of them regarding their concurrence with the views which this Government
has from the outset announced and advocated in respect to the conservation
of the independence and integrity of the Chinese Empire as well as of Korea,
and the mainteriance of complete liberty of intercourse between those countries
and all nations in matters of trade and industry. 
 With iegard to the concluding paragraph of the Russian memorandum the Government
of the United States, while sharing the views therein expressed as to the
continuance of the "open-door" policy against possible encroachment from
whatever quarter, and while equally solicitous for the unfettered development
of independent China, reserves for itself entire liberty of action should
circumstances unexpectedly arise whereby the policy and interests of the
United ~States in China and Korea might be disturbed or impaired. 


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