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United States Department of State / Papers relating to the foreign relations of the United States, with the annual message of the president transmitted to Congress December 2, 1902
(1902)

Belgium,   pp. 73-100 PDF (2.0 MB)


Page 84

 84 FOREIGN RELATIONS. 
shall immediately endeavor to obtain a decision from the other signatory
States as to the entering into force of the present convention among themselves.
 In faith of which the respective plenipotentiaries have signed the present
convention. 
 Done at Brussels, in one single copy, the 5th day of March, 1902. 
Final protocol. 
 At the moment of proceeding to the signature of the convention relating
to the régime of sugars entered into on this date by the Governments
of Germany, Austria and Hungary, Belgium, Spain, France, Great Britain, Italy,
The Netherlands, and Sweden, the undersigned plenipotentiaries have agreed
to the following: 
To ARTICLE TILlED. 
 Considering that the purpose of a surtax is to protect efficaciously the
internal market of producing countries the high contracting parties reserve
the right, each as it affects its own interests, to propose the increase
of the surtax in c~ase that considerable quantities of sugars fromim one
of the contracting States should enter their countries, this increase to
affect only time sugars coining frommi that State. 
 This proposition shall be addressed to the permanent commission, wimich
will decide within a short delay by a vote of time iriajority, upon the true
foundation of the proposed measure, upon the duration of its application,
and upon time rate of the increased tax, the latter not to exceed 1 franc
per 100 kilograms. 
 The adhesion of the commission can only be given in case the invasion of
the market in question should be the result of an economical condition of
real inferiority and not time result of a fictitious increase of prices promoted
by an understanding among producers. 
To ARTICLE ELEVENTH. 
 A. First. The Government of Great Britain declares that no direct or indirect
bounty shall be granted to sugars from colonies of the Crown during the existence
of the convention. 
 Second. It declares also, by exceptional measure and wimile still reserving,
in principle, its entire free action concerning time fiscal relations between
the United Kingdom and its colonies and possessions, that during the existence
of the convention no preference shall be granted in the United Kingdonm to
colonial sugars vis-a-vis the sugars coming froiri the contracting States.
 Third. It declares that they will submit the convention to the autonomous
colonies and to the East Indies in order that th'~ latter nmay have the privilege
of giving their adhesion thereto. 
 It is understood that the Government of Ilis Britannic Majesty shall have
time rigimt to adhere to the convention in the name of the Crown colonies.
 B. The Government of The Netherlands declares that, during the existence
of the convention, no bounty either direct or indirect simail be granted
to sugars of tIme Dutch colonies, and that these sugars shall not be admitted
into The Netherlands at a less rate than is applied to sugars coining from
the contracting States. 
 The present final protocol, which shall be ratified at the same time as
the convention concluded this (late, shall be considered as aim integral
part of said convention, and shall have the same force, value, and duration.
 In faith of which the undersigned plenipotentiaries have drafted the present
protocol. 
Done at Brussels, time 5th day of March, 1902. 
Jifr. Townsend to JJ&. flay. 
No. 135.] LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES, 
Brussels, May 6, 19O~2. 
 SIR: I have the honor to inform the 1)epartment that the Chamber of Representatives
of Belgium yesterday unanimously ratified the text of the recent sugar convention
which was signed at Brussels on March 5, 1902. 
 I have, etc., LAWRENCE TOwNsEND. 


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