University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Foreign Relations of the United States

Page View

United States Department of State / Papers relating to foreign affairs, accompanying the annual message of the president to the second session thirty-eighth congress
(1864)

Belgium,   pp. 226-266 PDF (15.5 MB)


Page 230

230                DIPLOMATIC CORRESPONDENCE. 
necessarily followed a legislative crisis have been conducted with good order,
and that the results are deemed auspicious to the stability and welfare of
the 
kingdom. 
I am, sir, your obedient servant, 
WILLIAM H. SEWARD. 
HENRY S. SANFORD, Esq., 4., Sc. 4'c., Brussels. 
Mr. Seward to Mr. Sanford. 
No. 145.3                          DEPARTMENT OF STATE' 
Washington, September 10, 1864. 
SIR: Our consul at Halifax has informed this department that Major Walker,
late insurgent agent at Bermuda, who was for several days in Halifax, took
the 
last steamer preceding that of the 23d ultimo for England, and that his visit
thither is for the purpose of attending to shipments of cotton of the insurgents
sent out to liquidate the cotton loan. He also goes out to use his best endeavors
to fit out in England another w~r vessel for the insurgents. You will, there-
fore, watch his movements, and endeavor to frustrate any designs hostile
to the 
United States. 
I am, sir, your obedient servant, 
WILLIAM H. SEWARD. 
HENRY S. SANFORD, Esq., 4-c., 4-c., 4-., Brussels. 
Mr. Seward to Mr. Sanford. 
DEPARTMENT OF STATE, 
Washington, September 17, 1864. 
SiR: I acknowledge the receipt of your private note of the 19th of August,
Which, as I perceive, was written under the influence of wearisome waiting
for 
goodnews. 
Well, before this time you, have been relieved. Admiral Farragut has de-
monstrated the national strength and energy at Mobile. Sherman has consum-
mated his campaign, and established the power of the Union, if not its authority,
in Georgia. The political intrigues at Niagara have exploded at Chicago,
to 
the undoubted edification of the whole people of the United States. The re-
enforcement of the armies is all that is desired. Peace is certainly three
years 
and three months nearer than it was when the war began, and political move-
ments on both sides of the line indicate a rational conviction that peace
must 
come soon as a fruit of the sacrifices already made, and that when it shall
have 
come it will be attended by the firm re-establishment of the Union. 
I think revolution is looming up in Europe everywhere, but it will not come
up this year. 
I am, sir, your obedient servant, 
WILLIAM H. SEWARD. 
HENRY S. SANFORD, Esq., y4c., 4-c., 4-c., Brussels. 
Mr. F. W. Seward to Mr. Sanford. 
No. 148.]                          DEPARTMENT OF STATE, 
Washington, September 26, 1864. 
SIR: I thank you for your interesting despatch of the 7th of September, No.
214. 
The wisdom of allowing Belgian subjects to take military service against
the 
republic of Mexico is the question which seems to be discussed in the Belgian
legislature. 


Go up to Top of Page