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United States Department of State / Papers relating to foreign affairs, accompanying the annual message of the president to the second session thirty-eighth congress
(1864)

Belgium,   pp. 226-266 PDF (15.5 MB)


Page 228

228 
DIPLOMATIC COIRRESPONDENCE. 
of the pirates, I shall hope that, though we may not all at once rescue our
com- 
merce, we shall at least save ourselves effectually from foreign interference
in 
our affairs. 
I am, sir, your obedient servant, 
WILLIAM H. SEWARD. 
HENRY S. SANFORD, Esq., ,4'., 4'c., 4c., Brussels. 
Mr. Seward to Mr. Sanford. 
No. 135.]                          DEPARTMENT OF STATE, 
Washington, July 28, 1864. 
SIR: Your despatch of July 14, No. 202, has been received. The political
occurrences which, under ordinary circumstances, would be inconsequential,
as- 
sume significance at this moment, when the balance of power on the continent
is seriously disturbed. I hope that the withdrawal of members from the lower
house of the legislature in Belgium, so as to prevent a quorum, and defeat
the 
administration, forebodes ndthing more,*than a resort to a constitutional
election. 
I am, sir, your obedient servant, 
WILLIAM H. SEWARD. 
HENRY S. SANFORD, Esq., 3c., 3;c., 4-c., Brussels. 
Mr. Seward to Mr. Sanford. 
No. 136.]                          DEPARTMENT OF STATE, 
Washington, July 28, 1864. 
SIR: I have received your despatch of July 14, No. 203, which announces 
the arrival of the Niagara at Antwerp, and her early departure from that
port 
on a cruise for the Florida. That pirate, when last heard from, was capturing
unarmed vessels near our coast. The vessels which we sent out in chase have,
thus far, failed to find her. 
I am, sir, your obedient servant, 
WILLIAM     H. SEWARD. 
HENRY S. SANFORD, Esq., S'c,, C's., 4'., Brussels, 
Mr. Seward to Mr. Sanford. 
No. 137.]                          DEPARTMENT OF STATE, 
Washington, July 29, 164. 
SIR! I have your private note of the 15th of July, which, I see, is tinged
with a dark hue of apprehension. With my present convictions I cannot think
that any adjustment between Denmark and Germany will increase our exposure
to European assaults against our independence., On the contrary, I think
what- 
ever arrangement is made, there will be new jealousies among all the principal
maritime powers. The disturbances of this year adjourned to another will
excite 
more anxiety than any present outbreak would. 
I think, however, that parties in both Great Britain and France will be glad
to leave foreign questions, for a time, to engage in domestic agitation.
Of course, 
we may have disasters here, although we are not looking for them. War is
war; 
and this is only another name for uncertainty and vicissitude. But, in any
case, 


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