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United States Department of State / Foreign relations of the United States, 1952-1954. Indochina (in two parts)
(1952-1954)

Policy of the United States with respect to Indochina, 1952: U.S. assistance to French Union forces; military, economic, and diplomatic support for the Associated States of Indochina,   pp. 1-338 PDF (138.9 MB)


Page 1


POLICY OF THE UNITED STATES WITH RESPECT TO
  INDOCHINA, 1952: U.S. ASSISTANCE TO FRENCH UNION
  FORCES; MILITARY, ECONOMIC, AND DIPLOMATIC SUP-
  PORT FOR THE ASSOCIATED STATES OF INDOCHINA
790.5/1-252: Telegram
   The Minister at Saigon (Heath) to the Department of State 1
TOP SIECRMT                        SAIGON, January 2, 1952-noon.
  1307. Rptd info Paris 503 eyes only Bruce,2 London 20 eyes only
Gifford.3 For personal attn Secy.
  The French have now received assurances of increased US support
for their operations in Indochina (re Paris 3796, December 26 on
which I will comment in an early tel).4 They will before long request
further assistance, and perhaps not distant when it may be necessary
for us to use all our influence persuade them maintain their forces on
Indochina.
   I suggest before we go further with them and before making policy
commitments in SEA we shld re-examine our principal policy aims
in Far East. In our view, our local policies and operations in various
states and areas shld not only be consistent; they must always be
subordinate.
   From here it wld seem that security of the US vitally dictates as
 the principal objective in Far East the upsetting and eventual elimi-
 nation of militant Communist control of Chinese manpower and
 resources backed by Soy power. To us here a policy of mere contain-
 ment of Chinese Communist march appears inadequate and imprac-
 ticable. Likewise, possibility of Chi Communist regime breaking with
 Soviets appears utterly unlikely in next years to come. We realize that
 if it werelpossible publicly and suddenly to state this dynamic policy
 at present moment it wld probably frighten and deter our actual and
 potential allies; presumably neither public nor official opinion in the
 US may yet be.prepared for or convinced of the national necessity of
   Minister Donald R. Heath was accredited to the Kingdoms of Cambodia and
 Laos as well as to the State of Vietnam.
   This telegram was transmitted in two parts.
   2David K. E. Bruce, Ambassador in France.
   Walter S. Gifford, Ambassador in the United Kingdom.
   'For text of the reference telegram, see Foreign Relations, 1951, vol.
vi, Part 1,
 p. 573. For Minister Heath's comments on it, see telegram 1331 from Saigon,
 Jan. 6, p. 10.
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