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United States Department of State / Papers relating to the foreign relations of the United States, 1921
(1921)

Costa Rica,   pp. 646-669 PDF (8.1 MB)


Page 646

COSTA RICA
BRITISH CLAIMS AGAINST COSTA RICA1
Refusal by the American Government to Support the British Government in
Demanding Arbitration on the Validity of the Amory Concession-Decision
by Costa Rica to Accept Arbitration of the Claims of John M. Amory and
Son and the Royal Bank of Canada
818.6363 Am 6/60: Telegram
The Charge in Costa Rica (Thurston) to the Secretary of State
SAN JOSE, February 14, 1921-5 p.m.
[Received February 15-12: 10 a.m.]
12. Minister for Foreign Affairs has just confidentially informed
me that he and British Minister have agreed to submit the Amory
petroleum concession matter to arbitration and that Spanish Min-
ister (Pedro Quartin) will be requested to act as arbiter.
This probably will result in decision favorable to British interests.
Full report by mail.2
THURSTON
818.6363 Am 6/60: Telegram
The Charge in Costa Rica (Thiurston) to the Secretary of State
SAN JOSE', February 24, 1921-9 p.m.
[Received February 25-11: 05 a.m.]
20. British Minister during a conversation last night said if
Congress repudiates agreement signed with him    by Minister of
Foreign Affairs his Government will avail itself of more forceful
arguments. He intimated that absolute commercial boycott would
be put into effect.
From other sources have learned that he has so threatened Costa
Rican Government. England is principal market for Costa Rican
coffee and boycott would be very harmful.
It is my opinion that Minister for Foreign Affairs and the Presi-
dent are anxious to accept British terms not only to avoid difficul-
ties but also to diversify oil interests which with sole exception of
'For previous correspondence, see Foreign Relations, 1920, vol. i, pp. 836
if.
2Not printed.
646


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