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United States Department of State / Papers relating to the foreign relations of the United States, 1920
(1920)

Germany,   pp. 258-600 PDF (122.9 MB)


Page 258

GERMANY
CONTINUATION IN FORCE OF THE ARMISTICE BETWEEN THE
UNITED STATES AND GERMANY
763.72119/8679a
The Secretary of State to the Swiss Minister (Sulzer)
WASHINGTON, January 13, 1920.
SIR: I have the honor to request your good offices in transmitting
to the German Government the following statement on behalf of
this Government:
" The Government of the United States regards the armistice as
continuing in full force and effect between the United States and
Germany notwithstanding the deposit of ratifications of the Treaty
of Versailles which took place in Paris on January 10, 1920."
For your information I have the honor to add that the substance
of the above statement is being conveyed informally to the repre-
sentatives of Germany in Paris by the American Embassy in that
city.
Accept [etc.]                             ROBERT LANSING
RELATIONS   OF THE    AMERICAN    COMMISSIONER   WITH   THE
GERMAN AUTHORITIES; GERMAN DESIRE FOR REPRESENTA-
TION AT WASHINGTON
701.6211/479: Telegram
The Commissioner at Berlin (Dresel) to the Secretary of State
BERLIN, June 8, 1920-noon.
[Received 7: 55 p.m.]
588. In the course of informal conversation with Von Haniel,
Under Secretary of State, he cautiously broached the subject of
unofficial German representation at Washington to correspond to
[this] commission. He hinted that reciprocity in this respect seemed
only fair though he acknowledged there might be difficulties. In
view however of the possibility of regular relations not being re-
sumed for a considerable period, he thought such representation
extremely desirable especially from point of view of commerce and
passports. He added that the idea was personal with him and that
the Cabinet had not discussed the matter.
258


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