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United States Department of State / Papers relating to the foreign relations of the United States with the address of the president to Congress December 2, 1913
(1913)

Italy,   pp. 608-624 PDF (6.0 MB)


Page 608

 ITALY.608 2 Continued from For. Rel. 1012, pp. 632-633. 
SOVEREIGNTY O~ ITALY OVER LIBYA; ATTITUDE OF THE UNITED STATES IN REGARD
TO RECOGNITION THEREOF. RELINQUISHMENT OF EXTRATERRITORIAL RIGHTS.' 
File No. 765.003. 
The Italian Uharg~ d'Affaires to the Secretary of Stat~. 
[Translation.] 
No. 1704.]       ITALIAN E1\lBAssY, 
 TVashington, October 30, 1912. 
 MR. SEcRETARY OF STATE: In accordance with the telegraphic instructions
that I have received from his excellency the Minister for Foreign Affairs,
I have the honor to inform your excellency that in consequence of the recognition
by the foreign powers of our sovereignty over Tripolitania and Cyrenaica,
the special régime fornierly enjoyed by foreigners in those territories,
by virtue of the Capitulations of the Ottoman Empire, has ended, in conformity
with universally accepted principles of international law. The necessary
instructions have consequently been issued to the Royal authorities in Libya
for the application to foreigners, from November 1, of the dispositions of
the general law, with the reservation of providing for the settlement of
all pending questions by eventual accords and- further dispositions. 
 Begging your excellency kindly to acknowledge this communication, I have
[etc.] 
 G. ~ 
File No. 765.003/7. - 
The American Ambatsador to the Secreta~j of State. 
No. 247.] AMERICAN E~iBAssY, 
 - Rome, October 30, 1912. 
 SIR: For some time past local newspapers have been giving currency to statements
as to the recognition of Italian sovereignty over Tripoli and Cyrenaica.
 Visiting the Foreign Office today, the Vice Minister for Foreign Affairs,
Prince di Scalea, made reference to the matter and remarked upon the method
with which the subject had been dealt with by our Government. 
 He then read to me a despatch from the Italian Ambassador in Washington
detailing a late visit to the Department of State. He wrote that his conversation
was with Mr. Adee and that he had 


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