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United States Department of State / Papers relating to the foreign relations of the United States, with the annual message of the president transmitted to Congress December 3, 1901
(1901)

Uruguay and Paraguay,   pp. 531-533 PDF (188.7 KB)


Page 531

URUGUAY AND PARAGUAY. 
CITIZENSHIP OF MINOR SON OF A UNITED STATES CITIZEN, 
BORN AND RESIDING WITHOUT THE UNITED STATES. 
fur. Finch to fuft. Hay. 
No. 442.] LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES, 
]Jfontevideo, Uruguay, Aky 21, 1901. 
 SIR: I inclose copy of a letter from Mr. John G. Hufnagel, United States
commercial agent at Paysandu, Uruguay, dated May 11, 1901, in which he requests
me to issue a certificate of citizenship to his son to replace one issued
by the United States minister in Germany. 
 The case of Mr. Hufnagel seems unusual to me and is referred to you for
instructions. 
 Respectfully, WILLIAM B. FINCH. 
[Inclosure.] 
Mr. Ilufnagel to Mr. Finch. 
COMMERCIAL AGENCY OF THE UNITED STATES, 
Paysandu, May 11, 1901. 
 SIR: I have three sons; the oldest, George A., was born at Baltimore, Md.,
and is now United States vice-commercial agent here. The other two, Louis
F. E., aged 17 years, and Richard P., aged 15 years, were born here. 
 When I was in Washington in the month of June, 1899, I called on the chief
of the naturalization bureau, stating to him that I have been United States
cOnsular and commercial agent here since 1873, and asking him if my two younger
sons, born here, would have the privilege of American citizenship. He answered
that any sons of United States consular officers who were citizens of the
United States are considered Americans, and if my two sons were in the United
States he would give them a certificate of American citizenship, but as they
were at the time at college in Nuremburg, Germany, he advised me to apply
to the United States consul in Nuremburg (to whom he wrote a few 1ine~),
who would take the boys' deposition and request the LTnited States minister
at Berlin to grant a certificate of citizenship. Following these directions,
the boys received in August, 1899, their certificate of citizenship from
the United States embassy at Berlin. Since then Louis attended college in
Gera, Germany, where it seems this certificate was mislaid, and he arrived
here a few weeks ago without it. 
 Now, would you kindly inform me if you could grant him a certificate of
citizenship; and if not, what steps I would have to take in order to have
my son exempted from military duty here? 
Respectfully awaiting your answer, I remain, etc., 
JOHN G. HUFNAGEL, 
United States Commercial Agent. 
531 


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