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United States Department of State / Foreign relations of the United States, 1958-1960. China
(1958-1960)

China,   pp. 1-814 PDF (284.6 MB)


Page 1


CHINA
  JANUARY-AUGUST 1958, BACKGROUND OF THE TAIWAN
  STRAIT CRISIS: POSSIBLE RENEWAL OF THE
  AMBASSADORIAL TALKS; SECRETARY OF STATE DULLES'
  VISIT TO TAIWAN IN MARCH 1958; U.S. CONCERN WITH
  GROWING TENSION IN THE TAIWAN AREA
1.    Editorial Note
    Ambassador to Czechoslovakia U. Alexis Johnson and Chinese Am-
bassador to Poland Wang Ping-nan held a series of meetings in Geneva
between August 1, 1955, and December 12, 1957. Documentation con-
cerning their meetings is in Foreign Relations, 1955-1957, volume III and
volume III Microfiche Supplement. At their last meeting, Johnson in-
formed Wang that he was being transferred from Prague to a new post
and that Edwin W. Martin had been designated to replace him as the
United States representative; see volume III, page 657.
     A letter of January 14,1958, from Wang to Johnson refused io accept
 this arrangement and stated that if the United States intended to con-
 tinue the talks it should designate a representative of ambassadorial
 rank. For text, see American Foreign Policy: Current Documents, 1958,
 pages 1129-1130. It was transmitted in telegram 588 from Geneva, Janu-
 ary 15. (Department of State, Central Files, 611.93/1-1558)
     A January 20 memorandum from Robertson to Dulles recom-
 mended naming an ambassador to resume the talks within 2 or 3 months.
 (Ibid., 611.93/1-2058) A January 21 memorandum from Dulles' Special
 Assistant, Joseph N. Greene, Jr., stated that Dulles wished to defer action
 until after a pending visit to China by the mothers of three imprisoned
 Americans. It reads in part as follows:
     "The Secretary's particular concern is that if we move to resume
the
 Geneva talks, we may find that following release of the prisoners the
 only things left to talk about are those subjects which the Communists
 insist upon. He feels that with the transfer of Ambassador Johnson and
 the Chinese reply to notification thereof, we may have a plausible op por-
 tunity to break off the talks and that if we do not take advantage of this
 opportunity, we may be in for trouble." (Ibid., Geneva Talks Files:
Lot 71
 D 368, Geneva talks-Memos)
     These documents are in the Supplement.


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