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United States Department of State / Foreign relations of the United States, 1948. Eastern Europe; The Soviet Union
(1948)

Yugoslavia,   pp. 1054-1118 PDF (25.0 MB)


Page 1054


YUGOSLAVIA
INTEREST OF THE UNITED STATES IN THE DISPUTE BETWEEN YUGO-
SLAVIA AND THE COMMUNIST INFORMATION BUREAU; EFFORTS
TO REACH AGREEMENT REGARDING MUTUAL CLAIMS BETWEEN
THE UNITED STATES AND YUGOSLAVIA
8.60H.00/1-348: Telegram
The Ambassador in Yugoslavia (Cannon) to the Secretary of State
SECRET    URGENT                BELGRADE, January 3, 1948-7 p. m.
  6. During call on Foreign Minister 2 yesterday afternoon I was in-
formed Marshal Tito 3 would see me this morning. This was some-
what surprising as to timing but otherwise not entirely unexpected as
he had given me rather -particular attention at his November 29 recep-
tion4 and I had then taken opportunity to suggest that we pursue that
conversation sometime during office hours. He had promised to let me
know after he caught up with "extra work caused by visits abroad".
  Knowing that interview had been arranged for general informal
talk and that theme Tito expected me to develop was improved trade
relations, I started by brief discussion prewar and present trade (which
I shall report in separate telegram) 5 and managed transition to politi-
cal field by frank statement that many of US products Yugoslav
Government needs are in such short supply that exports naturally go
to countries friendly to US, and that Yugoslav Government cannot
expect credit, whether by US public agencies or commerc~iaanks,-so
long= as :-American public opinion -finds Yugoslav Government -in-
variably opposing US in all efforts for establishing peace and
reconstruction.
  This brought us to questions of Trieste and Greece." On Trieste he
said he hoped a good governor would be found soon. I agreed but
  'For previous documentation on relations with Yugoslavia, see Foreign Rela-
tions, 1947, vol. iv, pp. 744 ff.
  '2Stanoje Simid.
  ' Josip Broz-Tito, Yugoslav Premier and Minister of National Defense; Secre-
tary General of the Yugoslav Communist Party.
  ' Official reception celebrating the anniversary of the establishment of
the
Federal People's Republic of Yugoslavia.
  'Telegram 9, January 4, from Belgrade, intra.
  " For documentation on the political relations of the United Stattes
with the
Free Territory of Trieste, see volume iii. For documentation on the concern
of the
United States over the civil war in Greece and the assistance rendered to
the
Greek rebels by Yugoslavia, Bulgaria, and Albania, see pp. 222 ff.
      1054


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