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United States Department of State / Foreign relations of the United States diplomatic papers, 1937. General
(1937)

Statement on fundamental principles of international policy by the Secretary of State, July 16, 1937, and comments of foreign governments,   pp. 697-802 PDF (39.3 MB)


Page 697


STATEMENT ON FUNDAMENTAL PRINCIPLES OF INTER-
  NATIONAL POLICY BY THE SECRETARY OF STATE,
  JULY 16, 1937, AND COMMENTS OF FOREIGN GOVERN-
  MENTS
711.00 Statement July 16, 1937/10
  Memorandum by the Assistant Chief of the Division of Current
                    Information (Bucknell)
No. 124                           [WASHINGTON, July 16, 1937.]
  At the press conference this afternoon the Secretary informed the
correspondents that he had prepared a statement for the press 1 which
would be universally applicable to any disturbed situation anywhere
in the world. In explanation and as Background for the statement he
desired to inform the correspondents Off The Record that he had been
in the receipt of various inquiries as to whether we have been asked
to invoke the Nine Power Treaty la or some other treaty to which we
are parties which may or may not be affected by the Far Eastern situa-
tion. He explained that it is very difficult at this stage to know
exactly what is taking place in China. We receive masses of des-
patches mixed with reports and rumors; we are not yet certain as to
just what extent either or both sides are endeavoring to localize this
controversy or just what the chances of success to this end may be; if
efforts to localize the situation are not successful, we do not know at
the moment what occasions there may be for conferences between the
Central Chinese Government and Japanese officials. In any event,
as the correspondents were aware, both the Chinese and Japanese
authorities have been earnestly protesting any purpose on either part
to bring about a general state of hostilities. He thought that the
correspondents would agree that when the stage has been reached at
which we would invoke the Nine Power Treaty such action would be
the discrediting of present peaceful professions of either or both
parties and furthermore we would then have passed the stage where
we could use all our efforts to aid in any such peaceful adjustment as
might be feasible and practicable. For these reasons, at the moment
we are doing everything and saying everything that we can which is
1Infra.
la Treaty signed at Washington, February 6, 1922, Foreign Relations, 1922,
vol. I, P. 276.
                                                       697
975368-54  45


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