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United States Department of State / Foreign relations of the United States diplomatic papers, 1936. The American Republics
(1936)

Dominican Republic,   pp. 407-483 PDF (29.7 MB)


Page 407


DOMINICAN REPUBLIC
REPRESENTATIONS TO THE DOMINICAN REPUBLIC RESPECTING ITS
FAILURE TO EXTEND MOST-FAVORED-NATION TREATMENT AS PRO-
VIDED IN THE "MODUS VIVENDI" OF SEPTEMBER 25, 1924
811.3931/52
The Mini8ter in the Dominican Republic (Schoenfeld) to the Secretary
                            of State
No. 3405                          CIUDAD TRUJHJLO, July 10, 1936.
                                              [Received July 14.]
  Sm: I have the honor to inform the Department that, in conversa-
tion with the Minister of Foreign Affairs today, Se-nor Bonetti Burgos
introduced the subject of a possible trade agreement between the
United States and the Domni can Republic by referring to the Domini-
can Government's impression that a certain aloofness had been notice-
able on the part of the United States towards the Dominican Republic
in commercial matters and, indeed, generally. This supposed attitude
was the more noticeable by contrast with the attitude of the United
States towards other countries similarly situated in relation to the
United States. The Minister said that the Dominican Government
felt that, by virtue of this country's geographical position, which made
it natural for trade relations with the United States to be preponder-
ant in Dominican economy, negotiations for a trade agreement with
the United States could be undertaken to the mutual advantage of
both countries.
  The Minister stated that, though he had learned, during his visit
at Washington prior to assuming his duties here, that it would be
most difficult to obtain a quota for Dominican sugar exports to the
United States, the Dominican Government was still hopeful that such
a quota might be obtained.
  In this relation he mentioned a figure of 300,000 tons which, he
stated, would be of the utmost importance to Dominican economy
while, at the same time, it would be of only slight importance in rela-
tion to the total sugar imports into the United States from foreign
countries. The Minister then alluded again to the alleged aloofness
(retraimriento) of the United States towards the Dominican Govern-
ment and said, speaking "unofficially", that this attitude was
not un-
derstood here, especially since the Dominican Government was
                                                       407


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