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United States Department of State / Foreign relations of the United States diplomatic papers, 1936. The Near East and Africa
(1936)

Afghanistan,   pp. 1-7 PDF (2.2 MB)


Page 1


AFGHANISTAN
PROVISIONAL AGREEMENT REGARDING FRIENDSHIP, DIPLOMATIC
AND CONSULAR REPRESENTATION B E T W E E N THE UNITED
STATES AND AFGHANISTAN, SIGNED AT PARIS, MARCH 26, 19361
711.90H/41
   The Secretary of State to the Charge in France (Marriner)
No. 1198                        WASHINGTON, February 13, 1936.
  SIR: The receipt is acknowledged of your telegram No. 984 of
November 22, 1: 00 p.m.,2 and your dispatch No. 2326 of November
23, 1935,8 reporting that the Afghan Minister at Paris had handed a
note to the Embassy omitting the guarantee of immediate and uncon-
ditional most-favored-nation treatment in the proposed commercial
agreement between the United States and Afghanistan.
  You are requested to inform the Afghan Minister at Paris that
this Government appreciates the sincere efforts of the Government of
Afghanistan to arrive at a common understanding with respect to
a commercial agreement. It is with deep regret that this Govern-
ment finds that circumstances do not permit the Afghan Government
to enter into an agreement providing for unconditional most-favored-
nation treatment. The Government of the United States is so firmly
committed to this principle as a basis of commercial relations that it
cannot deviate from it.
  It is suggested that you advise the Afghan Minister verbally that
Afghan goods entering the United States are, in fact, treated on a
plane of equality with the goods of the most favored nation, and
this Government understands that American goods are similarly
treated in Afghanistan. You may further advise the Minister that
so long as American goods continue to enjoy most-favored-nation
treatment in Afghanistan, similar treatment will continue to be
extended to Afghan goods in the United States. You may point
out that in the circumstances there would appear to be no prejudice
to the commercial relations between the United States and Afghan-
istan notwithstanding that it has not been found possible to conclude
a formal understanding on this point.
  ' For previous correspondence, see Foreign Relations, 1935, vol. i, pp.
555 if.
  2Ibid., p. 563.
  Not printed.


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