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United States Department of State / Foreign relations of the United States diplomatic papers, 1935. The Far East
(1935)

China,   pp. 508-820 PDF (113.4 MB)


Page 508


CHINA
RAISING OF THE AMERICAN LEGATION IN CHINA TO THE STATUS
OF EMBASSY AND ABOLITION OF THE CONSULATE GENERAL AT
NANKING1
701.9493/88: Telegram
    The Ambassador in Japan (Grew) to the Secretary of State
                                       TOKYO, May 9, 1935-noon.
                                    [Received May 9-6:22 a. m.]
  101. 1. The Vice Minister for Foreign Affairs 2 sent for me this
morning and informed me of the decision of the Japanese Government
to raise its diplomatic mission in China to the status of an Embassy
within the next few weeks. He added that his Government "would be
only too pleased" if the Government of the United States should
decide to take the same step and that the publication of the Japanese
decision would be held up for a week or 10 days in case the American
Government should wish to take simultaneous action.
  2. The Vice Minister said that when the Italian Government re-
cently raised its mission in China to the status of an Embassy, the
British Ambassador had raised the point that there had been an
understanding among the principal powers interested in China that
such a step would not be taken without prior consultation. The Vice
Minister said that he had therefore carefully examined the archives
and had ascertained that no assurances of consultation had been given
by the Japanese Government owing to the fact that for the past 10
years the Foreign Office budget had provided for an Embassy in China
and that the Government was only awaiting a favorable moment to
put into effect this decision already long ago taken in principle. (See
our 220, October 9, 5 p. m., 1934 3).
  3. The Vice Minister, in reply to my inquiry as to the reasons for
taking the step at this particular moment, replied that it envisaged
no alteration whatever in Japan's relations with China. As technical
point of view the step was taken to permit Ariyoshi4 to return to
China with the ambassadorial rank to which he was already entitled,
having been formerly Ambassador to Brazil. He could not be expected
1For previous correspondence, see Foreign Relations, 1934, vol. In, pp. 535
ff.
2Mamoru Shigemitsu.
' Foreign Relations, 1934, vol. iII, p. 540.
'Akira Ariyoshi, Japanese Minister in China.
     508


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