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United States Department of State / Foreign relations of the United States diplomatic papers, 1934. The American Republics
(1934)

Haiti,   pp. 293-371 PDF (28.3 MB)


Page 293


HAITI
WITHDRAWAL OF AMERICAN MARINES FROM HAITI AND TRANSFER
  TO THE HAITIAN GOVERNMENT BY THE UNITED STATES OF CER-
  TAIN PROPERTY IN HAITI
838.00/3182
  The Minister in Haiti (Armour) to the Acting Secretary of State
No. 196                       PORT-AU-PRINCE, November 28,1933.
                                          [Received December 2.]
  SIR: I have the honor to submit herewith a memorandum on the gen-
eral subject of the disposition of United States Government property
in Haiti,' in connection with the withdrawal of the United States
Marine forces in October 1934, as provided by the Accord of August
7, 1933.2
  There are a great many aspects of this question which, I feel, should
receive the early attention of the Department. During the eighteen
years [in] which United States military forces have been present in
Haiti, large stocks of military and nonmilitary material have accumu-
lated and numerous buildings, both temporary and permanent, have
been erected on Government or privately owned land. It is believed
that these structures and a part of the stock of supplies on hand are not
of sufficient value to justify the expense of transportation to the United
States, either for sale or for use by the American Government there.
It would seem that in the disposition of this property our Government
is offered an excellent opportunity to make a generous gesture to the
Haitian Government which, properly handled, would have an ex-
cellent effect both here and throughout Latin-America. Conversely,
I feel that if our Government should pursue a commercial dollars and
cents policy, in disposing of this property, the amount of money ac-
tually to be saved to the Treasury could in no way compensate for
the good will which might otherwise be obtained. If existing statutes
conflict with such a course, the Department may wish to consider the
advisability of having appropriate legislation introduced at the next
session of the United States Congress.
  The Garde d'Haiti, which has been built up to its present state of
efficiency through the efforts of American Marine Corps officers, is
now to be placed on its own resources with the sole assistance of a small
American Military Mission. The Garde d'Haiti has never owned its
' Not printed.
2Foreign Relations, 1933, vol. v, p. 755.
                                                       293


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