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United States Department of State / Papers relating to the foreign relations of the United States with the address of the president to Congress December 7, 1915
(1915)

France,   pp. 380-403 PDF (9.3 MB)


Page 380

380FRANCE. 
TREATY FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OP GENERAL PEACE, CON 
CLUDED BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND FRANCE. 
Signed at Washington, September 15, 1914; ratification advised by the Senate,
September 25, 1914; ratified by the President, January 14, 1915; ratified
by 
France, December 3, 1914; ratifications exchanged at Washington, January
22, 1915; proclaimed, January 23, 1915. 
Treaty Series No. 609.] 
B~ THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. 
A PROCLAMATION. 
 Whereas, a Treaty between the United States of America and the French Republic
looking to the advancement of the cause of general peace was concluded and
signed by ththr respective Plenipotentiaries at Washington, on the fifteenth
day of September, one thousand nine hundred and fourteen, the original of
which Treaty, being in the English and French languages, is word for word
as follows: 
Treaty to facilitate the se~ttlemsnt of Disputes. 
 The President of the United States of America and the President of the French
Republic, desiring to strengthen the friendly relations which unite their
two countries and to serve the cause of general peace, have decided to conclude
a treaty for these purposes and have consequently appointed the plenipotentiaries
designated hereinafter, to-wit: 
 The President of the United States of America, the Honorable William Jennings
Bryan, Secretary of State of the United States; and 
 The President of the French Republic, His Excellency J. J. Jusserand, Ambassador
of the French Republic to the United States; 
 Who, after exhibiting to each other their. full powers, found to be, iii
due and proper form, have agreed upon the following articles: 
ARTICLE 1. 
 Any disputes arising between the Government of the United States of America
and the Government of the French Republic, of whatever nature they may be,
shall, when ordinary diplomatic proceedings have failed and the High Contracting
Parties do not have recourse to arbitration, be submitted for investigation
and report to a Permanent International Commission constituted in the manner
prescribed in the following article. 
 The High Contracting Parties agree not to resort, with respect to each other,
to any act of force during the investigation to be made by the Commission
and before its report is handed in. 


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