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United States Department of State / Papers relating to the foreign relations of the United States with the annual message of the president transmitted to Congress December 6, 1910
(1910)

France,   pp. 508-516 PDF (3.1 MB)


Page 508

508FRANCE. 
FLOODS IN PRANCE. 
File No. 23286/1. 
President Taft to the President of France. 
THE WHITE HOUSE, 
Washington, January 27, 1910. 
 Is there any manner in which, through the National Red Cross or otherwise,
appropriate expression could be made of the sympathetic distress with which
the people and Government of the United States learn of the reported calamities
which floods are causing your beautiful and historic capital, as well as
in the Provinces of France? Meanwhile I offer you the sincerest sympathy
and the most ardent wishes that the cause of these disasters may soon abate.
WM. H. TAFT. 
File No. 23286/1. 
The Acting Secretary of State to Ambassador Bacon. 
[Telegram—Paraphrase.] 
DEPARTMENT OF STATE, 
Washington, January 27, 1910. 
 Mr. Wilson informs Mr. Bacon of the sending of the telegram which the President
has addressed to-day to the President of the French Republic and says that
the National Red Cross state they would be prepared to cable $5,000. Directs
Mr. Bacon to telegraph for their information whether this would be advisable
and acceptable, and if so, when and how it should be transmitted. 
 Mr. Wilson inquires as to the general situation, and asks if there has been
any suffering on the part of Americans. 
File No. 23286/1. 
Ambassador Bacon to the Secretary of State. 
[Telegram—Paraphrase.] 
AMERICAN EMBASSY, 
Paris, January 28, 1910. 
 Mr. Bacon says he called at the Foreign Office this morning and expressed
the deep sympathy of the Government and people of the United States for the
dreadful calamities caused by the flood, and inquired if it would be perfectly
agreeable to the French Government to receive contributions from American
citizens to aid the sufferers—many offers of aid having been cabled
him from the United States. He says he was assured that such funds would
be 


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