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United States Department of State / Papers relating to the foreign relations of the United States, with the annual message of the president transmitted to Congress December 7, 1903
(1903)

Great Britain,   pp. 452-564 PDF (44.4 MB)


Page 452

 aFor other correspondence on this subject, see under Germany, page 417;
Italy, page 601; and Venezuela, page 788. 
 b Printed Foreign Relations, 1901, p. 196. 
 GREAT BRITAIN.452 
DIFFICULTY WITH VENEZUELA GROWING OUT OF NONPAYMENT OF CLAIMS AGAINST THE
GOVERNMENT OF THAT COUNTRY OF NATIONALS OF GREAT BRITAIN AND OTHER COUNTRIES.a
Aft. Hay to Nr. White. 
[Telegram—-Paraphrase.] 
DEPARTMENT OF STATE, 
Washington, December 5, 1902. 
 (Mr. Hay states that, at the request of J. and W. Seligman & Co., bankers,
New York, who are trying to make an arrangement to effect a settlement of
the Venezuelan debt, it gives him pleasure to say that the President would
be glad if such.an arrangement could be made as might obviate the necessity
of any exhibition of force on the part of Germany and Great Britain. Mr.
White will understand, however, that the United States Government assumes
no obligation whatever in the nature either of a material or moral guaranty
of a~~y liabilities created by the transaction. 
 This instruction is sent for Mr. White's information in case anyone in interest
makes inquiry of him.) 
Jib. IIa'q to Aft. White. 
[Telegram—Paraphrase.] 
DEPARTMENT OF STATE, 
Washington. December 12, 1902. 
 (Mr. Hay, referring to the pro~memoriab of the Imperial German embassy of.
December 20, 1901, stating that the proposed pacific blockade of Venezuelan
harbors "would touch likewise the ships of neutral powers, inasmuch as such
ships, although a confiscation of them would not have to be considered, would
have to be turned away and prohibited until the blockade should be raised,"
directs Mr. White to say to the British Government that the United States
adheres to the position taken by it in relation ~o the Cretan blockade in
1897 [see Foreign Relations, 1897, p. 255], and therefore does not acquiesce
in any extension of the doctrine of pacific blockade which may adversely
affect the rights of states not parties to the controversy, or discriminate
against the commerce of neutral nations; and that the Government of the United
States reserves all of its rights in the premises.) 


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