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United States Department of State / Papers relating to the foreign relations of the United States, with the annual message of the president transmitted to Congress December 2, 1902
(1902)

Siam,   pp. 943-948 PDF (315.7 KB)


Page 943

  943SIAM. 
QUESTION AS TO WHETHER A UNITED STATES OFFICIAL MAY 
ISSUE A PASSPORT TO A UNITED STATES CITIZEN RESIDING 
IN THE DISTRICT OF ANOTHER UNITED STATES OFFICIAL— APPLICATION OF HENRY
S. WETHEBBEE. 
31r. li7ng to Jlfr. hay. 
No. 111.] LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES, 
Bangkok, February 6, 1902. 
 SIR: Is a consular or diplomatic officer who is duly authorized to issue
United States passports permitted to issue a passport to a citizen of the
United States who is at the time of application residing in the jurisdiction
of another official so authorized? 
 The statutes and instructions are riot clear on this point, but seem to
imply that he is not. Will the Department please interpret? 
1 have, etc., 
 HAMILTON KING. 
JJIr. flay to Jfr. K&tg. 
No. 83.] DEPARTMENT OF STATE, 
    Wash'ington, 2jfarch 19, 1902. 
 SIR: I have to acknowledge the receipt of your dispatch, No. 111, of the
6th ultimo, asking if a consular or diplomatic officer of the United States,
who is duly authorized to issue passports, is permitted to issue one to a
citizen of the United States residing at the time of application in the jurisdiction
of another officer so authorized. 
 "Instructions to the Diplomatic Officers of the United States" and the "Regulations
Prescribed for the Use of the Consular Service of the United States," do
not prohibit an officer from issuing a passport to a citizen who is residing
in some other officer's district. Extraordinary circumstances may be conceived
where he should do so, as, for instance, when a passport, being imperatively
needed, communication with the officer in his district might he impracticable
or impossible to a citizen. 
 But it is obvious that, except in a most unusual case, application should
be made to the diplomatic or consular officer of the applicant's district,
and that an officer issuing a passport to a citizen residing in another officer's
district would be infringing upon the latter's prerogatives and interfering
with his legitimate functions of office. 
 An officer is supposed to know, or have means of knowing, whether a citizen
in his district is entitled to receive a passport, and if an applicant, being
refused by one officer, could apply to another, tnere would be confusion
and injustice. 


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