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United States Department of State / Papers relating to the foreign relations of the United States, with the annual message of the president transmitted to Congress December 2, 1902
(1902)

Chile,   pp. 116-128 PDF (950.5 KB)


Page 116

116CHILE. 
RELATIONS BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND CHILE. 
Aft. TVdson to Air. hay. 
No. 224.] LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES, 
Santiaqo, January 3, 19093. 
 SIR: I have the honor to inclose herewith copy and translation of an article
published in El Mercurio (a daily paper of this city), giving an account
of a testimonial to me as representative of the Government of the Ti nited
States in Chile, upon New Year's eve. 
 I also inclose herewith copy and translation of an editorial published in
La Ley (a daily paper of this city), upon January 2. 1 have thought that
these publications might be of interest to the Department as indicating the
very excellent footing upon which our relations with this country are at
the present time. 
 I have, etc., HENRY L. WILSON. 
[Inclosure 1.—Translation.] 
From El Mercurio, Santiago, January 2, 1902. 
GRAND DEMONSTRATION AT THE UNION CLUB IN HONOR OF MR. HENRY L. WILSON. 
 At the traditional supper with which the Union Club every 31st of December
celebrates the coming of the new year, an imposing demonstration of regard
was made on Tuesday last, in honor of the worthy representative of the United
States, Mr. Henry L. Wilson. 
 Two large halls of the club were fitted up for the New Year's supper, profusely
illuminated with the electric light, and adorned with bamboos, palms, and
beautiful flowers. At 12 o'clock precisely more than 400 people were seated
around the tables, and the orchestra began its well-selected programme. 
 At that moment Mr. Wilson, who is a member of the club, arrived, in company
with several of his friends, and took his seat at one of the tables. Everyone
present at once stood up and cheered for Mr. Wilson, the President of the
United States (Mr. Roosevelt), and the great North American Republic. The
demonstration was spontaneous and a surprise. The American minister was greatly
impressed as he listened to the speeches of several members, and responded
in grateful language, expressing his thanks for the demonstration in his
honor. 
 All then sat down again and the supper proceeded, while gaiety and harmony
reigned supreme. 
 An hour afterwards, when the members of the club began to retire, it was
suggested to accompany the American Ininister to his residence. 
 More than 400 people, walking two by two, followed Mr. Wilson to the legation,
cheering him enthusiastically. There the minister briefly and courteously
expressed his thanks for the demonstration, and the various groups then retired.
 There were present at the New Year's supper, besides one of the directors
of the club, Don Enrique Larrain Alcade, two members of the cabinet, numerous
members of Congress, several officers of the army, and a large number of
distinguished gentlemen. 
 The demonstration in honor of the American minister is a beautiful social
note in proof of the regard in which the people hold the representative of
a great friendly nation, both in his official as well as his private capacity.


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