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United States Department of State / Papers relating to the foreign relations of the United States, with the annual message of the president transmitted to Congress December 3, 1901
(1901)

Turkey,   pp. 514-530 PDF (1.2 MB)


Page 514

 TURKEY. 
COURTESIES TO U. S. S. KENTUCKY BY TURKISH OFFICIALS. 
J1&. Griscom to JWr. Hay. 
[Telegram—Paraphrase.] 
LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES, 
Uonstantinople, December 11, 1900. 
 (Mr. Griscorn requests that arrangements be made for the Kentucky to remain
a little longer in order that any impression of hostility may be removed,
and states that, with the Department's approval, he will go to Smyrna on
December 13, if the affairs of the legation will permit.) 
JJfr. Hay to Nr. Griscom. 
[Telegram—Paraphrase.] 
DEPARTMENT OF STATE, 
Washington, December 11, 1900. 
 (Mr. Hay states that the Kentucky has been ordered by the Navy Department
to remain.) 
JJ&. Griscom to JJfr. flay. 
No. 295.] LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES, 
Uomstantinople, December 12, 1900. 
 SIR: I have the honor to confirm my telegram of yesterday wherein I request
that the battle ship Kentucky be allowed to remain a little longer in Turkish
waters in order to remove any impression that its visit here is of a hostile
nature. 
 I have to acknowledge the receipt this day of your reply. 
 I have now to report that on the 10th instant I attended a dinner at Yildiz
Palace, accompanied by Captain Chester and his staff. I presented these gentlemen
to His Majesty in audience before dinner, and after dinner Captain Chester
and I were received in a long private audience. 
 The Sultan welcomed Captain Chester cordially, and expressed to him the
pleasure he had in entertaining him in Constantinople. During the conversation
there was no mention of the diplomatic affairs pefiding between the two countries
beyond the fact that the Sultan stated he had purchased a cruiser from Messrs.
Cramp, of Philadelphia. It was apparent that he regarded our questions as
absolutely settled, and his evident desire was to convey this impression
without using any direct expressions. He evinced a most friendly disposition
514 


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