University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Foreign Relations of the United States

Page View

United States Department of State / Papers relating to the foreign relations of the United States, with the annual message of the president transmitted to Congress December 3, 1901
(1901)

Spain,   pp. 457-485 PDF (2.4 MB)


Page 457

457 Printed Foreign Relations, 1900, p. 893.SPAIN. 
PROTECTION BY REPRESENTATIVES OF THE UNITED STATES OF PORTO RICANS, CUBANS,
AND FILIPINOS. (SEE FOREIGN RELATIONS, 1900, P. 891, ET SEQ.) 
Jlrr. Storer to )ift. Hay. 
No. 363.] LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES, 
Madrid, December 920, 1900. 
 Sin: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of Department instruction
No. 244,a bearing date November 9, and containing the reading of cablegrams
exchanged between this legation and the Department on the subject of evidences
of citizenship presented by natives of Cuba, Porto Rico, and the Philippine
Islands. 
 While the final sentence of the instruction does not seem to be entirely
in accord with the telegrams, so specific, which preceded that instruction
upon the same subject, I have presumed that it was not intended to repeal
or modify the purport of those telegrams, and have not, therefore, in any
way informed the consular officers in this country of any instruction later
than that of your telegram. 
 The importance of this subject and the complications continually arising,
both at this legation, at our various consular offices, and in the Government
of Spain itself, leads n~e to lay before you as clearly as possible the problems
presented. I do this also at the suggestion of more than one consular officer
in Spain, who are of opinion that the Department may not be exactly advised
of the details of the system recognized in your circular letter of May 2,
1899, and the changes that have been made, either by the authority of the
War Department or of the provisional authorities, in the islands of Cuba
and Porto Rico since the date of that circular letter. 
 The theory, as it has been gathered by all the consular officers to whom
it has been sent, as well as this legation, on which was based that instruction,
was that the "cedula de vecindad" presented by natives of these islands,
would be one issued by the authority in these islands. That, of course, was
the case on my first arrival, and that equally, of course, by lapse of time
has ceased to be the case at present. The "cedula de vecindad," under Spanish
law which heretofore governed in all her colonies and still remains the law
in Spain, is that a cedula of this character must be applied for by every
citizen or native, of either the home country or of the colony, in which
the applicant was resident at the time of the expiration of his former cedula.
These papers have been and are issued for one year only, and the Spanish
law has been quite severe, apparently, in punishing, both by fine and by
indirect legal consequences, the failui'b to procure a new one at the end
of the life of the old one. 


Go up to Top of Page