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United States Department of State / Papers relating to the foreign relations of the United States, with the annual message of the president transmitted to Congress December 3, 1901
(1901)

Great Britain,   pp. 199-246 PDF (3.6 MB)


Page 199

 GREAT BRITAIN.  199 
FILIPINO SEAMEN HELD NOT TO BE CITIZENS OF THE UNITED 
STATES. 
MEMORANDUM. 
BRiTISH EMBASSY, 
TVas/iinqton, JW~y ~6, 1900. 
 Cases have recently occurred in which British merchant vessels arriving
at Boston from the Philippine islands bring Filipinos as seamen on board,
properly signed on the articles. These men, on arrival at Boston, ask for
their discharge, as they claim to be United States citizens, and as such
they can be discharged with the sanction of the British consul. But if they
are not considered United States citizens, consular sanction to their discharge
would have to be refused. 
 The customs authorities at Boston hold that the Filipinos in question are
not entitled to claim American citizenship. 
 The undersigned would be glad to be made acquainted with the view of the
State Department with regard to this point, which appears to be dealt with
by Article IX of the treaty of peace between the United States and Spain,
signed at Paris December 10, 1898. 
PAUNCEFOTE. 
MEMORANDUM. 
DEPARTMENT OF STATE, 
Washington, July 19, 1900. 
 With reference to the request contained in the memorandum of the British
embassy of May 26 last, for an expression of the views of this Government
upon the matter of the citizenship of Filipinos, intended for the guidance
of British consuls at ports of the' United States in determination of the
question whether they may or may not discharge Filipinos who, serving as
seamen on British merchant vessels, ask to be discharged at United States
ports before the voyage for which they have signed articles has terminated,
the Attorney-General, to whom the subject has been referred, writes, under
date of. July 12, that the question is not to be lightly determined. A man
may be a citizen in one sense of the word, or from certain points of view,
or for certain purposes, yet not in every sense nor for all purposes. 
 He asks to be informed more definitely what the facts in the cases which
have arisen may be, and in what manner the question of citizenship presented
itself, believing that he would thereafter be better able to pass upon the
subject. 


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