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United States Department of State / Papers relating to the foreign relations of the United States, with the annual message of the president transmitted to Congress December 5, 1898
(1898)

Argentine Republic,   pp. 1-9 PDF (565.4 KB)


Page 1

F H 98—-i  1CORRESPONDENCE.
ARGENTINE REPUBLIC.
ARGENTINE-CHILE BOUNDARY DISPUTE.
[Telegram.]
Mr. I)ay to Mr. Buchanan.
DEPARTMENT OF STATE,
Washington, D. 0., July 29, 1898.
BUCHANAN, Minister, Bnenos Ayres:
 Learning with great regret of the tension which has arisen in regard to
the boundary demarcation between the Argentine Republic and Chile, the Goveriiment
of the United States charges you to express the earnest hope that the parties
may find it practicable to compose their differences in accordance with the
agreement already existing for marking the boundary by the commissioners,
and for arbitrating any point on which tl.ie commissioners may be unable
to agree.
DAY.
Mr. M. Garcia Mérou to Mr. Hay.
[Translation.]
ARGENTINE LEGATION,
Marblehead Reck, Mass., September 25, 1898.
 MR. SECRETARY OF STATE: I have the honor to inform your excellency that
I am just in receipt of a telegram from my Government advising me that the
boundary question pending between the Argentine Republic and Chile, by mutual
agreement of both Governments, is to be submitted to the arbitral decision
of Her Majesty the Queen of Great Britain, in conformity with the stipulations
in existing treaties, and particularly with the agreement of 1896, which
I had the pleasure of communicating to your excellency with one of my earlier
notes. According to said compacts the line whose fixation is given' into
the haiids of an arbitrator is that which runs from the twenty-sixth parallel
to the fifty-second—the definitive tracing of the frontier in the region
known as "Puna de Atacama" being yet to be determined by means of direct
itegotiations which are now proceeding without hindrance.
 This solution, which removes, happily, all fear of conflict between the
two countries while satisfying the wishes of both, in no way diminishes the
gratitude which my Government feel~ for the interest shown by that of your
excellency for a pacific settlement of the longstanding and complicated difficulty.


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