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United States Department of State / Index to the executive documents of the House of Representatives for the second session of the fiftieth Congress, 1888-'90
(1888-1889)

Supplement A: Papers relating to the case of Lord Sackville,   pp. 1667-1729 PDF (30.8 MB)


Page 1667


                        SUPPLEMENT A.
                        GREAT BRITAIN.
             Papers relating to the case of Lord Sackville
                           LIST OF PAPERS.
 A. Mr. Murchison to Lord Sackville. September 4, 1888.
 B. Lord Sackville to Mr. Murchison. September 13, 1888.
 1. Mr. Bayard to Mr. Phelps. Telegram. October 25, 1888.
 2. Mr. Phelps to Mr. Bayard. Telegram. October 26, 1888.
 3. Mr. Bayard to Mr. Phelps. Telegram. October 26, 1888.
 4. Mr. Phelps to Mr. Bayard. Telegram. October 28, 1888.
 5. Report of the Secretary of State to the President. October 29, 1888.
 6. Mr. Bayard to Lord Sackville. October 30, 1888.
 7. Mr. Bayard to Mr. Phelps. Telegram. October 30, 1888
 8. Lord Sackville to Mr. Bayard. October 30, 1888.
 9. Mr. Bayard to Mr. Phelps. No. 990. October 31.1888.
10. Mr. Phelps to Mr. Bayard. No. 842. November 2, 1888.
11. Mr. Phelps to Mr. Bayard. No. 845. November 7, 1888.
12. Mr. Bayard to Mr. Phelps. November 20, 1888.
13. Mr. Phelps to Mr. Bayard. No. 858. December 1, 1888.
14. Mr. Phelps to Mr. Bayard. No. 861. December 5, 1888.
15. Mr. Phelps to Mr. Bayard. No. 874. December 29,1888.
16. Mr. Phelps to Mr. Bayard. No. 893. January 12, 1869.
17. Mr. Phelps to Mr. Bayard. No. 901. January 16, 1889.
18. Mr. Bayard to Mr. Phelps. No. 1054. January 30, 1889.
Appendix: British White Book, United States, No. 4 (1888).
                                  A.
             Mr. Charles F. iliurchison to Lord Sackville.
                                   POMONA, CAL., September 4, 1888.
  SIR: The gravity of the political situation here and the duties of those
voters who are of English birth, but still consider England the mother-
land, constitute the apology I hereby offer for intruding for information.
  Mr. Cleveland's messagc to Congress on the fishery question justly
excites our alarm and compels us to seek further knowledge before
finally casting our votes for him as we had intended to do. Many En.
glish citizens have for years refrained from being naturalized, as they
thought no good would accrue from the act, but Mr. Cleveland's admin-
istration has been so favorable and friendly toward England, so kind in
not enforcing the retaliatory act passed by Congress, so sound on the
free-trade question, and so hostile to the dynamite school of Ireland,
that by the hundreds-yes, by the thousands-they have become nat-
uralized for the express purpose of helping to elect him over again. The
one above all of American politicians they consider their own and their
country's best friend.
  I am one of these unfortunates, with a right to vote for President in
                                                            1667


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