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United States Department of State / Index to the executive documents of the House of Representatives for the second session of the fiftieth Congress, 1888-'90
(1888-1889)

Japan,   pp. 1059-1080 PDF (10.2 MB)


Page 1059


                             JAPAN.
                             No. 731.
                    Mr. Hubbard to Mr. Bayard.
                              [Extract.]
No. 394.]                LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES,
           Tokio, Japan, October 10, 1887. (Received November 2.)
  SIR: I beg to respectfully call your attention and careful reading of
the inclosed leading editorial which I have taken from the August num
ber, 1887, of The Australasian and South American, a representative
commercial journal and of marked influence in diplomatic and consular
circles (and "devoted to the extension of commerce between the United
States and Canada and Australasia, South Africa, South America and
India, China and Japan, etc."), under the head of "Our trade with
China and Japan." While the present status of that trade is in the
main correctly stated, yet it is due to truth and candor to say that the
writer of the article misleads, unintentionally, no doubt, as to matters
of fact, when speaking of our volume of trade with these countries that-
  We are unmeasurably distanced alike by Germany and Great Britain, both
of
which countries look upon China and Japan as the most important fields for
the de-
velopment of their vast foreign commerce.
  The statistics of the customs annual return for 1886 show, to use
round numbers, that the aggregate export and import trade between
the United States and Japan was over twenty-three millions of yen as
against twenty-one millions between Great Britain and her colonies and
Japan, and three millions between Germany and Japan, facts which I
had the honor in my dispatch No. 316 to the Department of State to
present fully by figures and tables in connection with a [eview of the
annual trade of Japan with all countries for 1886.
  It is true Great Britain's exports to Japan are largely in excess of the
exports from the United States to this country, but the gratifying fact
was made manifest in the trade returns for 1886 that the American
export trade had increased during that year over 1885 nearly a million
dollars in value. As to Germany, the entire sum total of her exports
and imports is less than four millions, nearly twenty millions less than
that of the United States with Japan. As to the other obstacles and
disadvantages to our more enlarged commercial progress in this country,
mentioned by the writer of the article inclosed, they are stated with
force and fact, and deserve to be earnestly studied and heeded by our
countrymen who propose extending our trade in the East 'with steady
steps against all competitors. The hopeful horoscope cast by the same
ICHARD .13., JtBBA.1D0
                 1059
                             JAPAN.
                             No. 731.
                    Hr. Hubbard to Mr. Bayard..
                               [Extract.]
 No. 394.]                LEGATION OF Tim@ UNITED STATES7
            Tokio, Japan, October 10, 1887. (Received November 2.)
   SIR: I beg to respectfully call your attention and careful reading of
 the inclosed leading editorial which I have takenfrom the August nuim -,
 ber,_ 1887, of The Australasian and South. American, a representative
 commercial journal and of marked influence in diplomatic and consular
 circles (and I I devoted to the extension 'of commerce between the United
 States and Cana da and Australasia, South Africa, South America and.
 India7. China and Japan, etc.11), under the head of "Our trade with
 China and Japan.77 While the present status of that trade is in the
 main correctly stated, yet it is due to truth and candor to say that the
 writer of the article misleads, unintentionally, no doubt, as to matters
 of fact, when speaking of our volume of tradewith these countries that-
 We are unmeasurably distanced alike by Germany and Great Britain, both of
 which countries look upon China and Japan as the most.important fields for
the de-
 velopment of their vast foreign commere,6.
 The statistics of the custom's 'annual return for 1886 show, to use,
 round numbers, that the aggregate export and import trade between
 the United States and Japan was over twenty-three millions of you as
 against twenty-one millions between Great Britain and her colonies, and
 Japan, and three millions between Germany and Japan, facts which I
 ha                                                       -State to
   d the honor in my dispatch No. 316 to the Department of
 present fully by figures and tables in connection with a review of the,
 annual trade of Japan with all countries for 18 8-6- .
   Itis true Great Britain's exports to Japan are largely in excess of the
 exports from the United States to this country, but the gratifying fact
 was made manifest in the trade returns for 1886 that the American
 export trade had increased during that year over 1-885 nearly a million,
 dollars in value. As to Oxermany the entire sum total of her exports
 andl im orts is less than four millions, nearly twenty millions less than
 that of the United States with Japan, As to the other obstacles and
 disadvantages to our more enlarged commercial progress in this country,
 mentioned by the writer of the article inclosed, they are stated with
 force and fact, and deserve to be earnestly studied and hiBeded by our
 countrymen who propose extending our trade in the East ' with steady
 steps against all competitors. The hopeful horoscope cast by the same,
 intelligent writer for the future of our trade relations in Japan and
-China, is not without sound support in reason,
      I have, etc.,
                                                 -Vý ID T71'-r-r-w-%-v-%
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