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United States Department of State / Index to the executive documents of the House of Representatives for the second session of the forty-fifth Congress, 1877-'78
(1877-1878)

Denmark,   pp. 33-36 PDF (2.0 MB)


Page 33


DENMARK.                             33
Toys .............-......     $11, 828 46
Woolen goods-.....-,-......  2127 432,
Printed books_- ---------14,384 98
Cordials-.-......... ........  3,894J18
Linen goods----------------67. 233 11
Crockery-------------------10,764'83
Machinery-.-..............    48,486 97
Medicines-............-....--16,957 42
Haberdashery-.---.---.......  80,469 05
Furniture------....... .....-  9,591 76
Paper of all kinds-.......... 29,8"29 25
Perfumery-.................    7, 312 54
Sugar-machinery-...-...-1...--778 68
Petroleum-................-    2,580 19
Pianos---------------------5, 963 83
Tanned leather........    21,459 64
Fine jwelr------..........   $37,694 38
Hardware------------......    31,872 92
Watches and, clocks        9,318 55
Ready-made clothing.       1,921 66
Empty bags----------------28,145 29
Common salt .........2,037 40
Silk goods-----------112,592,35
Seeds and plants...------------  236 19
Saddles------..............  -1,789 10
Hats-.--------------------44, 674 28
Manufactured tobacco ......    4,135-81
Iron roofs and tubing     10,946-55
Plain glass-...-...-..-------  5,822 50
Wire----------------...  .    52, 65182
     Total.--------2. 22264, 831 9a-
                           DENMARK.
                               No. 12.
                     Mr. Cramer to Mr. Evarts.
No. 443.]                  LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES,
             Copenhagen,.October 31, 1877. (Received November 21.)
  SiR: Referring to the Department's dispatch of the 7th of August
last, marked "1Separate," relating to the question of methods by
which
the trade of the different nations with the United States' may be most
judiciously fostered and enlarged, and instructing me Oby examination
and inquiry to enable myself to point out branches of trade with Den-
mark in which the United States may profitably and usefully share, I
have now the honor, after having thus far devoted considerable time
and attention to the examination of this question, to communicate to
you the following statements and observations as some of the results
arrived at.
  This subject will, however, receive still further attention from me.
I.-OBSTACLES IN- THE WAY OF AN ENLARGEMENT OF THE COM-
       MERCE BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND DENMARK.
  1. Denmatrk proper is situated in the northern part of Europe be.
tween 530 and 580 north latitude, and 70 and 130 east longitude, and
consists of the peninsula of Jutland, the islands of Sealand, Fuenen,
Laaland, Langeland, Fal ster, MWen, Samsoe, Bornholm, and other
,smaller ones, having a total population of about 1,874,000 inhabitauts.
It is therefore evident that the smallness of the kingdom and the nature
of its territory, form no small obstacles in the way of the development
of an extensive commerce between it and the United States.
  2. The utter lack of a regular line of steamships or sailing-vessels
between the United States and Denmark, greatly retards trade and comn-
merce between the two countries.
  3. Denmark is not much of.a manufacturing country. The raw ma-
terials for the comparatively few factories it possesses are either pro-
duced at home or imported from England, France, Germany, and Swe-
den. So, too, are most of the different manufactured articles in use.
      3F RA
-T7


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