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United States Department of State / Papers relating to foreign affairs, accompanying the annual message of the president to the second session thirty-eighth congress
(1864)

Belgium,   pp. 226-266 PDF (15.5 MB)


Page 226

226 
DIPLOMATIC CORRESPONDENCE. 
BELGIUM. 
Mr. Seward to Mr. Sanford. 
No. 118.]                          DEPARTMENT OF STATE, 
Washington, October 5, 1863. 
SIR: Your despatch of the 10th ultimo, No. 148, announcing the election of
M. Rogier, has been received#,I His conduct of affairs has been so just and
fair 
to us that we may be allowed to express satisfaction with the results**of
an 
election, which leaves him in a position, no doubt, as beneficial to his
country 
as it is agreeable to us. 
I am, sir, your obedient servant, 
WILLIAM     H. SEWARD. 
HENRY S. SANFORD, Esq., 4-c., Brussels. 
Mr. Seward to Ir., Sanford. 
DEPARTMENT OF STATE, 
-Washington, November 9, 1863. 
SIR: I have your note of the 15th of October, giving an account of a con-
versation with the French minister for foreign affairs. 
I am sorry to perceive in "his remarks no evidence of a consideration
that 
indifference to the struggle going on between this government and the insur-
gents is infidelity towards the United States. Mr. Drouyn de t'Huys seems
to suppose that this country will ultimately recognize as friendly towards
itself 
even the concessions which are made to the insurgents, because the insurgents,
not less than the loyal men, are citizens of the United States. He falls
into 
the error of our northern apologists of the insurrection-that is, of supposing
that when the Union is restored the south will regain and wield their former
political influence. On the contrary, it is clearly enough to be. perceived
now 
that the division between north and south will disappear in this -war, and
that 
the loyalty of the whole country will be, ojogeneous in the sentiments which
are now maintained by the "government. I cannot but desire that France
may, 
at the end of the struggle, hold in relation to the United States the position
she 
held when the war began. Perhaps you may have another opportunity to fol-
low up the conversation. 
I am, sir, your obedient servant, 
WILLIAM     H. SEWARD. 
HENRY S. SANFORD, Esq., 4 c., Brussels. 
Mr. Seward to Mr. Sanford. 
No. 122.]                        DEPARTMENT OF STATE, 
Washington, November 30, 1863. 
SIR: Your despatch No. 157, dated November 10, has been received. 
His Majesty's reception, on the occasion of the late opening of the legislative
session, both without and within the chambers, was a gratifying expression
of 
the affection felt by a loyal people towards a wise, kind, and liberal monarch.


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