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United States Department of State / Message of the President of the United States to the two houses of Congress, at the commencement of the second session of the thirty-seventh congress
(1861)

Instructions and despatches: Portugal,   pp. [403]-413 ff. PDF (3.9 MB)


Page [403]

PORTUGAL. 
Mr. Morgan to Mr. Seward. 
[Extract.] 
Lo. 6 6.]                         UNITED STATES LEGATIoN, 
Lisbon, April 6, 1861. 
SIR:    *     *     *      *      *      *      * 
During the evening his Majesty inquired with interest as to the condition
of affairs in the United States, but when I assured him, as I had before
done 
on a similar occasion, that the Union would be preserved, his manner was
more expressive of doubt than belief, though he replied that he hoped I was
not mistaken, as it would be a great pity to see so fine a country ruined,
and 
I regret to say that my colleagues, and European politicians generally, 
regard the disruption of the States as an established fact. 
*      *      *      *      *     *      *      * 
With high respect, I have the honor to be your obedient servant, 
GEORGE W. MAORGAN. 
lion. W. H. SEWARD, Secretary of State. 
Mr. Morgan to Mtr. Seward. 
No. 67.]                          UNITED STATES LEGATION, 
Lisbon, May 29, 1861. 
SIR: I have the honor to enclose a copy of my note to the government of 
HI. M. F. Majesty on the subject of privateers. 
I have notified our consular agents of the importance of vigilance. 
Would it not be good policy to take into regular commission a considera-
ble number of our clipper ships, till our navy can be placed on a basis com-
mensurate with the crisis ? 
The telegraph announces that the President has notified the foreign powers
that he will discontinue diplomatic relations with any nation that recognizes
the so-called Confederate States. 
I trust that it is true, for such a policy will produce good results, and
is 
not less wise than it is dignified. 
If we come out of this contest triumphant, and the Union be preserved, 
our nation will be more powerful and more glorious, more loved and more 
feared, than ever before in our history as a nation. 
I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 
GEORGE W. MORGAN. 
HOn. WKr. H. SEWARD, Secretary of State. 


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