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History of the Forest Products Laboratory

Interview #984: Gust, Dolores (June, 2009)

View all of First Interview Session (September 11, 2008)

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00:31:18 - 00:34:36 Memories

memories, stories, anecdotes, pulp and paper; Seidel, Hall treatment, University of Wisconsin, cooperation, projects

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00:31:18

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EJ

Yeah, yeah. Do you have any other memories or stories, fun anecdotes like that about other folks, or?

DG

Oh I have tons, but you know I have a mental block about all; there are many many fun things we had.

EJ

Sure.

DG

I, one time that---this is really, I'll never forget it---I worked in the Pulp and Paper section and if you ever, if you're doing history and you hear about J. [Albert, Alfred?] Hall, he was one of the first directors of the Lab, and he was very gruff, very and I was scared to death of him. So I was secretary to Bob [Seidel?] at the time, who became president of the Simpson Timber Company out in Oregon and my heart broke when he left, but I hadn't become the steno supervisor yet, I was working for him. But anyway, Dr. Hall calls for Bob Seidel when he was on his break. And I answer the phone, you know, Mr. Seidel's office and he said, where is he? And I said well, he's out of the office and he said find him and hung up. I was so damn mad. You know I was probably twenty, twenty-one and I slammed the phone down and Bob was down in the coffee shop and went rushing down and I said that rude director wants you to call him and I was babbling, babbling on, you know. And so that afternoon, I was in the coffee shop and in walks the director and he comes up to me and says I hear you got mad at me this morning [chuckles]. I tell you, I nearly, I could hardly stand; my legs felt like rubber. And so then he said maybe I deserved it, I should talk a little nicer. And so then I rush back to my boss and I was bawling him out and he was having, choking he was laughing so hard [laughter]. Just great memories like that.

00:33:09

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EJ

So overall did you feel like you were, you were just treated very well?

DG

Oh yes.

EJ

Great.

DG

There were a couple of guys there---I don't want to go into that negative part, but, they came from private industry and worked at the Lab and they just didn't fit in. Not with me and not with, I didn't like their work ethic and I don't think they stuck around too long. There were some of those times, you know. But most of the time, people worked at the Lab forever and ever and ever, you know? But when they transferred from private industry, they just were a different breed.

EJ

Sure.

DG

At least as far as I was concerned.

00:33:58

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EJ

And were you ever involved in anything that did work with the University?

DG

Well that's, every, all of our reports were in cooperation with the University of Wisconsin, that was written on the cover, so yeah, there was, there were a lot of, boy I can't think now who some of there were, that we'd collaborate with people at the UW on different projects and then the guys would write papers and the University would get credit for it. But, I can't think of any names right now. There was a lot of that going on.

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