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History of the Forest Products Laboratory

Interview #927: Moody, Russell C. (June, 2009)

View all of First Interview Session (May 5, 2008)

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00:08:42 - 00:11:42 Projects, Satisfying

Projects, satisfying; Selbo, Leonard; Frieze, Allen; USDA, Research, Douglas fir, Southern Pine, ASTM Standard, relationship with the industry; American Institute of Timber Construction

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00:08:42

LB

Interesting. How about some of the interesting projects that you worked on---what was maybe the most satisfying for you?

RM

Over the whole time?

LB

Over the whole time.

RM

Well, I think, I think in the, the most satisfying thing for me was accumulation of things. When I started in the laminating research in 1967, I guess it was, there was a, there was a technical bulletin called, Bulletin 1069, it was kind of the bible of the laminating industry. It was a USDA technical bulletin by Allen Frieze and Leonard Selvo. And that was the basic reference for everything that was done as far as engineering was concerned, as laminated timber. And that was published, I think, in '54. And so, by '67 and then the research that we did over the next, I would say, ten years, we found out that a lot of that needed to be supplemented, the information that was in there, because the resource had changed, the experiments that had been done back in the '40s, '30s and '40s was all on pretty old growth material, a lot of it on Douglas Fir, and the, the laminating industry was using both Southern Pine and Douglas Fir, but mostly second growth material by that time. And it was different characteristics of the wood. And so we, the work that we did, I would say, we slowly developed supplemental information that had to go along with this Bulletin 1069. And the way we put it all together was to write an ASTM standard. And I think, probably the most satisfying thing for me was working over the years on that ASTM standard, and we finally got it to the point that it was adapted, adopted by ASTM. And then, and then I think, we immediately found out there needed to be lots more changes on it. So, the development of a national standard for procedures to develop engineering properties for, for laminated timber, I think was probably what I enjoyed the most on it, in addition to working with the people.

We had a pretty good relationship with the industry at that time because they relied on the Forest Products Lab very heavily for their engineering data, and for their development of standards and stuff like that. And, so we worked closely with the association of laminating manufacturers which was called the American Institute of Timber Construction, or AITC. And there was some excellent people there to work with, and they were; they came through and helped us a lot as far as providing research material and providing funding for travel when we didn't have funding, stuff like that. So, and we thought it, the research that we do, we were able to implement it pretty darn quickly through that association.

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