University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Ecology and Natural Resources Collection

Page View

Bureau of Mines / Minerals yearbook 1990
Year 1990, Volume 2 (1990)

West, Wanda J.; Gere, Milton A., Jr.
Michigan,   pp. [254]-269 PDF (2.4 MB)


Page 255

MICHIGAN—1990  255THE MINERAL INDUSTRY OF MICHIGAN 
This chapter has been prepared under a Memorandum of Understanding between
the U.S. Bureau of Mines, U.S. Department of the Interior, and the Geological
Survey Division, Michigan Department of Natural Resources for collecting
information on all nonfuel minerals. 
By Wanda J. West' and Milton A. Gere, Jr.2 
 Michigan's 1990 nonfuel mineral production was valued at $1.4 billion. The
10 % decline from the record-high value established in 1989 was attributed
mainly to a 4-month strike by members of the United Steel Workers of America
Union, which resulted in a drop of almost one-third in the value of iron
ore shipments. Value decreases also were reported for the sales of calcium
chloride, clays, gypsum, iron oxide pigments, lime, magnesium compounds,
industrial sand, silver, and dimension stone. Gains were registered for some
of the principal 
mineral commodities used in construction, including cement, construction
sand and gravel, and crushed stone, and also for copper, gem stones, peat,
potash, and salt. Despite a slumping auto market, raw steel production was
at nearly the same 
~ level as that in 1989. 
~ The diversity ~ and . strength of 
~ Michigan's mineral industry enabled it to 
~ rank eighth, nationally, in value of nonfuel mineral production in spite
of a lengthy work stoppage in the iron ore industry, the largest contributor
to the State's nonfuel mineral value. The State 
accounted for about 4 % of the Nation's nonfuel mineral value in 1990. It
was the leading producer of calcium chloride, crude iron oxide pigments,
magnesium compounds, and peat; it ranked second in production of iron ore
and construction sand and gravel and third in portland cement, gypsum, and
industrial sand. Industrial minerals provided about twothirds of the State's
nonfuel mineral value. 
 Michigan's vigorous highway improvement program created a 24 % rise in the
value of State road contract awards 
TABLE 1 
NONFUFL MINERAL PRODUCTION IN MICifiGAN1 
Mineral 
1988 
1989 
1990 
Quantity 
Value 
Quantity 
Value 
Quantity 
Value 
(thousands) 
(thousands) 
(thousands) 
Cement: 
265 
5,253 
1,248,121 
NA 
1,958 
14,623 
714 
322 
53,508 
3,045 
' 38,800 
$22,915 
231,141 
4,432 
25 
11,630 
W 
36,088 
6,256 
138,171 
27,150 
' 120,300 
255 
5,449 
1,249,198 
NA 
2,089 
15,045 
621 
286 
' 48,000 
2,865 
40,905 
$22,286 
253,324 
4,599 
10 
15,589 
W 
32,479 
6,082 
' 132,000 
24,577 
123,678 
272 
5,906 
1,201,542 
NA 
2,000 
10,034 
622 
280 
53,729 
2,310 
' 43,100 
$23,880 
263,607 
4,094 
11 
11,511 
W 
30,898 
6,264 
153,057 
19,285 
' 129,000 
Masonry thousandshorttons 
Portland do. 
Clays metric tons 
Gemstones 
Gypsum(crude) thousandshorttons 
Iron ore thousand metric tons 
Lime thousandshorttons 
Peat ~o. 
Sand and gravel: 
Construction do. 
Industrial do. 
Stone(crushed) do. 
Combined value of bromine (1988), calcium 
chloride (natural), copper, gold (1988-89), iron 
oxide pigments (crude), magnesium compounds, 
potash (1989-90), salt, silver, stone (dimension), 
and values indicated by symbol W 
XX 
XX 
989,453 
1,587,561 
XX 
XX 
984,347 
1,598,971 
XX 
XX 
796,516 
1,438,123 
Total 
' Estimated. NA Not available. W Withheld to avoid disclosing company proprietasy
data; value incltalcd with ~COnIbLmd value' figure. XX Not applicable. 
' Production as eaasured by aiim shipments, sales, or marketable production
(incltating consumption by producers). 


Go up to Top of Page