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Bureau of Mines / Minerals yearbook 1990
Year 1990, Volume 2 (1990)

Prosser, L. J., Jr.
Maryland,   pp. [240]-245 PDF (728.1 KB)


Page 241

 
Mineral 
1988 
1989 
1990 
Quantity 
Value 
Quantity 
Value 
Quantity 
Value 
(thousands) 
(thousands) 
(thousands) 
Cement (portland) thousand short tons 
1 ,808 
357,833 NA 
6 
7 
19,266 
' 32,700 
' 20,729 
$89,083 
2,016 
5 
329 
W 
95,169 
' 167,000 
°l,5l5 
1 ,871 
351,464 NA 
— 3 
' 16,900 
30,841 
27,529 
$94,002 
1,882 
3 
— W 
' 84,500 
153,375 
2,072 
1 ,798 
338,775 NA 
— 3 
18,271 
' 30,500 
' 24,102 
$91,172 
1,712 
3 
— W 
104,023 
' 163,900 
' 1,751 
Clays metric tons 
Gemstones 
Lime thousand short tons 
Peat do. 
Sand and gravel (construction) do. 
Stone: 
Crushed do. 
Dimension short tons 
Combined value of other industrial minerals 
and values indicated by symbol W 
Total 
xx 
6,216 
xx 
6,053 
~öc 
342,050 
xx 
368,614 
~{ARYLAND— 1990  241THE MINERAL INDUSTRY OF MARYLAND 
This chapter has been prepared under a Memorandum of Understanding between
the U.S. Bureau of Mines, US. Department of the Interior, and the Maryland
Geological Survey for collecting information on all nonfuel minerals. 
By L. J. Prosser, Jr.' 
 The value of nonfuel mineral production in Maryland increased to a State
record of about $369 million in 1990. Demand for construction aggregates
remained at near record-high levels. An increase in price and production
of sand and gravel and a higher price for crushed stone contributed to the
State's gain in total value. 
 State and local legislation to increase regulation of the mining industry
was proposed with mixed results. Land use issues and decisions were expected
to have a major effect on Maryland's mining industry during the 1990's. 
TRENDS AND 
DEVELOPMENTS 
 Mineral consumption in Maryland began to slow down in 1990. Production of
construction aggregates (sand and 
gravel and crushed stone), the raw materials used in building, reached an
alltime high in Maryland in 1988 at 52 million short tons. High interest
and inflation rates in the early 1980's had adversely affected the home and
highway construction markets. In 1982, only about 25 million tons of construction
aggregates was produced Statewide. Once these rates ~ became lower, the demand
for minerals resurfaced. 
In 1990, output of construction aggregates totaled about 49 million tons.
However, other mineral commodities shipped into Maryland through the Port
of Baltimore showed a sharper decline. Cement, iron ore, and manganese ores
dropped significantly according to data compiled by the Maryland Port Administration.2
Iron ore imports dropped from 6.7 million tons in 1989 to 3.9 million tons
in 1990; cement declined 
from 420,000 tons in 1989 to 162,000 tons in 1990; and manganese ores, from
76,000 tons to 12,000 tons. 
LEGISLATION AND 
GOVERNMENT PROGRAMS 
 In 1990, State and local legislation was proposed to increase regulation
of the mining industry. In the State General Assembly, House bill 1430 was
proposed requiring public information meetings and hearings to be conducted.
by the Department of Natural Resources (DNiR) on all completed applications
for a surface mining permit. House bill 428 required the DNR to adopt regulations
relating to permit conditions for dewatering surface mining operations. In
Maryland, this bill would primarily affect stone quarry operators. This legislation
would make a quarry operator liable for 
TABLE 1 
NONFUEL MINERAL PRODUCTION IN MARYLAND' 
 xx 7,804 
 xx 362,921 
~Estiimted. NA Not available. W Withtald to avoid disclosing company proprietarydata;
value included with ' Combiced valce~ figure. XX Not applicable. 
' Production as measured by mice shipoanis, sales, or marketable production
(including consumption by producers). 


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