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Bureau of Mines / Minerals yearbook 1990
Year 1990, Volume 2 (1990)

Harrison, Donald K.; Anderson, Walter; Foley, Michael E.
Maine,   pp. [234]-239 PDF (747.1 KB)


Page 235

 
Mineral 
1988 
1989 
1990 
. 
Quantity 
Value 
(thousands) 
. 
Quantity 
Value 
(thousands) 
. 
Quantity 
Value 
(thousands) 
Gemstones 
NA 
10,183 
' 1,400 
' 7,512 
$150 
33,007 
' 5,300 
' 5,924 
NA 
°8,600 
1,591 W 
W 
' $30,100 
8,801 
W 
NA 7,865 
1,700 
W 
W 
$29,349 
8,700 
W 
Sand and gravel thousand short tons 
Stone: 
Crushed do. 
Dimension short tons 
Combined value of cement, clays (common), 
garnet (abrasive 1988), peat, and values 
indicated by symbol W 
23,379 
67,760 
xx 
xx 
25,753 
64,654 
xx 
xx 
24,495 
62,544 
Total 
%4A!NE—1990  235THE MINERAL INDUSTRY OF MAINE 
This chapter has been prepared under a Memorandum of Understanding between
the U.S. Bureau of Mines, U.S. 
Department of the Interior, and the Maine Geological Survey for collecting
information on all nonfuel minerals. 
By Donald K. Harrison,' Walter Anderson,2 and Michael B. Foley3 
 The value of Maine's nonfuel mineral production in 1990 was $62.5 million,
a $2. 1 million decrease compared with that of 1989. Construction sand and
gravel accounted for almost one-half of the State's total mineral value.
Other commodities produced, in descending order of value, were portland cement,
crushed stone, dimension stone, masonry cement, gem stones, clay, and peat.
TRENDS AND 
DEVELOPMENTS 
 In 1990, the value of total construction contracts, which relied heavily
on mineral aggregates, was down 23 % from that of 1989. The hardest hit sector
was in residential construction, which fell 39% from $308 million in 1989
to $189 million in 1990. The value of nonresidential building construction
contracts was down 13 % from $127 million to $110 million. The only increase
reported was in nonbuilding 
construction contracts, which rose by 23 % from $149 million to $183 million
in 1990. However, the increase in this category was not enough to offset
the losses in the other two categories. As a result of these construction
declines, demand for aggregates and building materials remained soft in 1990.
Decreases in output were reported for construction sand and gravel, common
clay, and portland and masonry cement. Estimated crushed stone output remained
essentially the same as that of 1989. 
 However, there were some bright spots for the construction and mineral industries.
A $40 million bond issue for a passenger rail line had been passed, and the
installation of new wastewater treatment systems, which received the bulk
of the public works funds, was scheduled to continue. A 30-mile-long portion
of the Maine Turnpike was also scheduled for expansion.4 
Over the past decade, many mining companies have been exploring 
TABLE 1 
throughout the State primarily for massive sulfide-base deposits. At least
three companies have announced a desire to obtain the environmental permits
necessary to place three deposits into production. As a result of this renewed
interest in metal mining in the State, new legislation to rewrite the State's
mining regulations was signed into law in 1990. The present rules were not
written with mining in mind and would effectively preclude any metal mining
activities in Maine. The State's last metal mine ceased operations in 1977.
REGULATORY ISSUES 
~ The Maine Low Level Radioactive 
~ Waste Authority (MLLRWA) gave the 
~ go-ahead to examine about one-half of 
~ Maine Yankee nuclear powerplant's 740- 
~ acre site in Wiscasset for a possible low- 
~ level radioactive waste (LLRW) site. 
. The nuclear powerplant was the first "volunteer" to offer its
compound
as a 
NONFUEL MINERAL PRODUCTION IN MAINE1 
xx 
xx 
' Estimated. NA Not available. W Withheld to avoid disclosing esmpany proprietary
data; value inclteled 
with ~ vah~' figure. XX Not applicable. 
' P~~~on as imasured by calm shipments, sales, or marketable production ~
consumption by producers). 


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