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Bureau of Mines / Minerals yearbook area reports: domestic 1978-79
Year 1978-79, Volume 2 (1978-1979)

White, Doss H., Jr.; Ratté, Charles A.
Vermont,   pp. 535-541 ff. PDF (724.4 KB)


Page 538

Table 5.—Vermont: Construction sand and gravel sold or used by
producers
1977 
1978 
1979 
tons) 
Value 
~ 
Value 
t~n 
tons) 
Value 
sands) 
Value 
ton 
(L~ 
tons) 
Value 
sands) 
Value 
ton 
Sand              
GraveL           
Total or average — — 
1,117 
2,288 
$1,853 
3,984 
$1.66 
1.74 
1,545 
2,181 
$2,692 
3,734 
$1.74 
1.71 
1,715 
1,945 
$3,054 
3,186 
$1.78 
1.64 
3,405 
5,837 
1.71 
3,726 
16,425 
1.72 
3,660 
6,240 
1.70 
' Data do not add tototal 
shown because 
of 
independent rounding. 
538 
MINERALS YEARBOOK, 1978-79 
Stone.—During the biennium, Vermont's stone industry produced crushed
limestone, granite, sandstone, marble, unspecified stone (primarily serpentine),
dimension granite, marble, and slate. Although output of crushed stone increased
approximately 100,000 tons in 1979, the number of quarries decreased by two-thirds.
In 1978, 11 quarries crushed limstone and marble; however, no production
was reported in 1979. There were 17 active producers of crushed limestone
and granite in 1978, but only 11 were in operation the following year. Unspecified
stone production decreased from nine quarries to two during the 2 years.
Completion of highway projects was a major factor in the closing of a number
of operations. 
Approximately 70% of the stone produced during the biennium was crushed limestone.
In 1979, output totaled 1.5 million tons, 200,000 tons over that produced
during the previous year. Limestone, mined and crushed at eight operations
in Addison, Crittenden, Frank, and Rutland Counties in the western part of
the State, was sold for bituminous aggregate, roadbase, and whiting. 
In 1979, there was no reported production of crushed marble or sandstone.
However, in 1978, the Vermont State Highway Department crushed marble at
two locations in Rutland County, and crushed sandstone at nine quarries in
four counties in the eastern and southeastern part of Vermont. The material
was used in highway construction for aggregate, roadbase, and fill. 
In 1979, unspecified stone, primarily serpentine, was quarried at two locations
in Lamoille and Orleans Counties in northern Vermont. Output was sold for
aggregate, riprap, and jetty stone. 
The crushed stone industry planned to activate three new or inactive quarries;
two were opposed by local groups. OMYA, Inc., formerly Vermont Marble Co.,
planned to open a marble quarry near Brandon. 
Stone would be shipped to the company's new marble crushing facility at Florence.
The company also planned to reopen an abandoned marble quarry in Florence,
which was' vehemently opposed by local citizens. The company has owned the
mineral rights to the quarry site and surrounding acreage since 1889, and
quarried stone until the early 1900's. Citizen opposition stemmed from concern
over the effects of blasting on local water wells and dwellings, and of heavy
truck traffic on the main road. 
 Another controversy arose when Pike Industries, Inc., applied for permission
to open a limestone quarry on Hale Mountain near Shaftsbury to supply aggregate
for 14 miles of new highway. Local residents and ' environmental groups opposed
the plan. The Shaftsbury Zoning Board of Adjusters denied the company a zoning
variance, and the company filed a $4.5 million lawsuit against the community.
The suit was dropped when Shaftsbury gave the company permission to mine.
 Sto Energy Conservation, Inc., a West German insulation manufacturing company,
established its U.S. headquarters in Rutland. The firm will manufacture exterior
building insulation from plastic foam and mesh, marble dust, and plaster.
Finely ground marble from the OMYA, Inc., plant at Florence will be used
in the manufacturing process. 
 During 1979, the State's dimension stone producers quarried 180,000 tons
of stone in seven counties, an increase of approximately 43,000 tons over
the previous year's output. Dimension granite accounted for approximately
62% of sales followed by 28% for slate and 10% for marble. 
 Dimension granite was quarried at seven locations in Orange, Orleans, Washington,
and Windsor Counties in northeastern Vermont. The majority of the stone was
marketed for rough monumental applica 


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