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Bureau of Mines / Minerals yearbook area reports: domestic 1978-79
Year 1978-79, Volume 2 (1978-1979)

Arndt, Robert H.; Burchett, Raymond R.
Nebraska,   pp. 329-336 PDF (836.9 KB)


Page 334

 
Use 
* 
1977 
1978 
1979 
Quantity 
(thohus~nd 
tons) 
Value 
(thou- 
sands) 
Value 
per 
ton 
Quantity 
(thohus~nd 
tons) 
Value 
(thou- 
sands) 
Value 
per 
ton 
Quantity 
(thousand 
short 
tons) 
Value 
(thou- 
sands) 
Value 
per 
ton 
Concrete aggregate — — Plaster and gunite sands —
4,804 
NA 
$9,445 NA 
$1.97 
NA 
4,745 
144 
$9,297 
258 
$1.96 
1.78 
3,814 
117 
$7,526 
208 
$1.97 
1.78 
Concrete preducts — — Asphaltic concrete —
— Roadbase
and 
984 
3,331 
2,282 
6,459 
2.32. 
1.94 
767 
3,396 
1,738 
6,834 
2.27 
2.01 
1,005 
2,697 
2,189 
5,492 
2.18 
2.04 
coverings       Fill             Snow and ice control — 
4,955 
2,605 NA 
8,975 
3,123 NA 
1.81 
1.20 
NA 
5,275 
2,342 
16 
10,607 
3,009 
22 
2.01 
1.28 
1.36 
7,010 
1,452 
24 
15,404 
1,921 
44 
2.20 
1.32 
1.83 
Railroad ballast — — — — 
W 
W 
W 
— — 
— — 
— — 
40 
149 
3.74 
Other uses        Total1 or 
167 
281 
1.75 
33 
141 
4.28 
38 
67 
1.78 
average       
16,848 
30,566 
1.81 
16,720 
31,910 
1.91 
16,197 
33,001 
2.04 
334 
MINERALS YEARBOOK, 1978-79 
Table 4.—Nebraska: Construction sand and gravel sold or used, 
by major use category 
NA Not available. W Withheld to avoid disclosing company proprietary data;
included in "Total." 1Data may not add to totals shown because
of independent
rounding. 
Table 5.—Nebraska: Construction sand and gravel sold or used by
producers
1977 
1978 
1979 
Quantity 
(thousand 
tons) 
Value 
(thou- 
sands) 
Value 
per 
ton 
Quantity 
(tho~is~nd 
tons) 
Value 
(thou- 
sands) 
Value 
per 
ton 
Quantity 
(thousand 
tons) 
Value 
(thou- 
sands) 
Value 
per 
ton 
Sand            Gravel            
Total1 or average — 
6,043 
10,805 
$10,843 
19,724 
$1.79 
1.83 
6,984 
9,735 
$12,739 
19,167 
$1.82 
1.97 
5,459 
10,738 
$10,070 
22,931 
$1.84 
2.14 
16,848 
30,566 
1.81 
16,720 
31,910 
1.91 
16,197 
33,001 
2.04 
°Data may not add to totals shown because of independent rounding.
more than 40% in 1979. Roadbases accounted for almost 32% of the product
use in 1978 and more than 43% in 1979. Requirements for fill and concrete
products were considerably smaller, whereas those for plaster and gunite
sand, snow and ice control, railroad, and all other uses individually accounted
for less than 1% of the total output. The modes of transportation of sand
and gravel reflected the proximity of the exploited deposits to the point
of use. During the biennium, about 89% of the sand and gravel was transported
by truck, 7.5% to 9.0% was moved by rail, only a minute quantity was moved
in any other manner; and 4% to 5% was used at the source. 
 Stone.—Preparation of aggregates and cement are the principal
uses
for stone, which ranked second in both quantity and value among the raw nonfuel
minerals produced in Nebraska. Output in 1979 was the highest in the period
1975-79. It followed relatively low production in 1976 and 1977 and recovering
production in 1978. The value of produced stone increased steadily to $19.4
million in 1979, the highest value in the 5-year period. Both increased production
and a growth in the average unit value 
of stone from about $2.40 per ton for crushed stone in 1975 to $3.88 per
ton in 1979 supported the high value of Nebraska stone output. The value
of crushed stone used for specific purposes ranged from less than $2 per
ton to more than $11 per ton in 1979. Growth of the average unit value between
1975 and 1979 was almost 60%. 
 Counties along the eastern boundary of the State, especially near Omaha,
and in the southeast were the main sources of stone. Dixon County in the
northeast had a small stone industry in both years of the biennium, and Holt
County in the northcentral part of the State supplied stone in 1978. Cass,
Washington, and Saunders Counties were the most productive counties, providing
more than 85% of the output and value of stone in the State during the biennium.
Stone was produced in 14 counties from a total of 24 quarries and by 15 firms
in 1978. The 12 source counties in 1979 had 22 quarries; 13 firms were active.
Quarry operations ranged in size from about 1,000 tons per year to 1 million
tons per year. Four quarries exceeded 500,000 tons output in both years.
Four had production between 100,000 and 500,000 tons per 


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