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Bureau of Mines / Minerals yearbook area reports: domestic 1978-79
Year 1978-79, Volume 2 (1978-1979)

Krempasky, G. T.; Lawson, Don C.
Montana,   pp. 315-327 ff. PDF (1.3 MB)


Page 316

316 MINERALS YEARBOOK, 1978-79 
Table 1.—Nonfuel mineral production in Montana1 
1977 
1978 
1979 
Mineral 
Quantity 
Value (thousands) 
Quantity 
Value (thousands) 
Quantity 
. 
Value 
(thou~ 
sands) 
Antimony        short tonsBarite thousand short tons - 
164 
10 
$663 W 
W W 
W W 
W W 
W W 
Clays do..~ 
Copper (recoverable content of ores, etc.) metric tons_ — Gemstones
 224 
78,202 NA 
 3,557 
115,167 
 100 
 217 
67,326 NA 
$3,699 
98,705 
 100 
424 
69,854 
NA 
$11,508 
143,268 
100 
Gold (recoverable content of oreé, etc.) 
 troy ounces. — Lead (recoverable content of ores, etc.) 
22,348 
3,314 
19,967 
3,865 
24,050 
7,395 
metric tona.. — 
96 
65 
132 
98 
258 
299 
Lime         thousand short tona.. — 
Pumice do...~ 
223 
 5 
7,705 
 7 
204 
~ 
7,030 
 ~ 
216 
~ 
8,965 
 ~ 
Sand and gravel do... — — — 
Silver (receverable content of ores, etc.) 
4,867 
10,421 
26,391 
214,230 
7,012 
15,106 
thousand troy Ounces.. — 
Stone: 
3,367 
15,558 
2,918 
15,759 
3,302 
36,618 
Crushed — — — — thousand short tons.
— 
Dimension do~~ 
3,680 
 3 
7,923 
114 
3,188 W 
7,733 W 
2,527 W 
7,806 
 W 
Talc do...~. 
Zinc (recoverable content of ores, etc.) 
226 
2,947 
319 
5,152 
343 
5,940 
metric tons. — 
79 
54 
79 
54 
104 
86 
Combined value of cement, fluorspar (1977), gypsum, iron ore, peat, phosphate
rock, sand and gravel (industrial, 1978), tungsten ore, vermiculite, and
values indicated by symbol W             
Total                      
XX 
45,658 
XX 
49,375 
XX 
54,196 
XX 
213,253 
XX 
205,800 
XX 
291,287 
 NA Not available. W Withheld to avoid disclosing company proprietary date;
value included in "Combined value" figure. XX Not applicable. 
 ' Producfion as measured by mine shipments, sales, or marketable production
(including consumption by producers). 
 2Excludes industrial sand; value included in "Combined value"
figure. 
Bureau of Land Management wilderness studies. No consensus concerning the
proposed Federal actions had surfaced in Montana, despite public reviews
and hearings throughout the State. Interest groups, including the Western
Environmental Trade Association (WETA), Montana Mining Association (MMA),
Montana Coalition for Wilderness (MCW), and the Inland Forest Resource Council
(IFRC), have made conflicting evaluations regarding RARE II. WETA and MMA
recommended Alternative B, which would allow multiple use; MCW offered Alternative
W and was calling for significantly more wilderness and wilderness study
areas; and, IFRC was in disagreement with MCW's proposal, but had not decided
on its position. Montana's Governor Thomas L. Judge had recommended that
20 of the roadless national forest areas, which contained about 600,000 acres,
be designated "instant wildernesses." In addition, the Governor
recommended
that a new category, "back country," be established for another
12 roadless
areas containing about 740,000 acres. 
 Public hearings relating to Federal actions were conducted throughout the
State. Included were a National RARE II Conference; a Senate Committee on
Energy and Natural Resources hearing on S.2080, a bill entitled "To
Make
the Federal Columbia River Power System Available for Maiimum Electric Efficiency
for Future Essential Power Supply, to Promote Conservation, and for Other
Purposes"; 6 public hearings related to land and water uses that were
held
under the auspices of the Missouri River Basin Commission; and meetings related
to the Great Bear and Elkhorn wilderness study areas. 
 The Montana Legislature convened on January 3, 1979,. after not having been
in session during 1978. Initiative 80, entitled "To Empower Montana
Voters
to Approve or Reject any Proposed Nuclear Power Facility Certified Under
the Montana Major Facility Citing Act", was passed by Montana voters
in November
1978. Under the initiative, an application for the construction of any nuclear
power facility would be~ submitted to the Department of Natural 


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