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Bureau of Mines / Minerals yearbook metals, minerals, and fuels 1972
Year 1972, Volume 1 (1972)

MacMillan, Robert T.
Salt,   pp. 1093-1102 PDF (925.1 KB)


Page 1095

1095 
Table 5.—Rock salt sold by producers in the United States 
(Thousand short tons and thousand dollars) 
Year Quantity Value 
 1968 12,461 79,867 
 1969 13,397 86,452 
 1970 14,170 95,291 
 1971 13,700 89,321 
 1972 14,434 91,041 
 Of the total salt consumed in 1972, 54% was consumed as brine, 33% as rock
salt, and 13% as evaporated salt. The produc 
tion of chlorine required 45% of the total salt output, soda ash manufacturing
required 13%, and all other chemicals re 
Table 7.—Salt sold or used by producers in the United States, by class
and consumer or use 
Consumer or use 
* 
1971 
. 
. 
1972 
. 
—i 
Evap- 
orated 
Rock Brine 
Total' 
Evap- 
orated 
Rock Brine 
Total' 
Chlorine                       
Soda ash                       
Soap (including detergents)       
All other chemicals  
Textile and dyeing             
Meatpackers, tanners, casing manufacturers                  
Fishing                        
Dairy                         
Canning                       
Baking                     
Flour processors (including cereal)_ - 
Other food processing  
Ice manufacturers and cold storage companies                
Feed dealers  
Feed mixers  
Metals                     
Ceramics (including glass)  
Rubber                        
Oil                      
Paper and pulp              
Water softener manufacturers and service companies           
Grocery stores  
Railroads                  
Bus and transit companies        
Highway use                
U.S. Government               
Miscellaneous'              
Total'               
282 
1 
24 
426 
118 
283 
33 
55 
185 
110 
68 
475 
1 
862 
329 
47 
4 
74 
54 
 105 
 418 
795 
1 
1 
331 
24 
1,074 
2,733 16,605 
 (' ) 6,357 
 W W 346 487 75 - - 
 370 -- 4 -- 6 -- 55 (2) 6 - - 11 (2) 
 40 (2) 
 2 -- 493 -- 258 -- 135 (2) 4 - - W W 60 51 115 59 
 W W 441 -- 2 -- 3 -- 7,571 4 34 (' ) 620 ' 792 
 19,621 302 6,358 W 27 22 1,259 440 193 132 
 653 266 37 42 61 56 241 160 116 110 79 70 515 483 
 4 1 1,355 933 586 354 182 W 8 4 172 86 164 47 279 W 
 680 350 1,236 802 31 3 J 7,905 464 59 26 2,487 705 
 2,706 17,718 W 5,786 5 (2) 479 117 75 -- 
 353 -- 4 -- 24 -- 68 (2) 7 -- 12 (2) 
 37 (2) 
 2 -- 453 (2) 223 -- 175 W 3 - - W W 62 93 125 W 
 W W 
 456 (2) 
 8,787 4 65 (2) 555 809 
20,726 
5,791 
27 
1,036 
207 
619 
45 
80 
228 
117 
83 
520 
3 
1,386 
577 
227 
7 
173 
202 
201 
698 
1,258 
6 
9,255 
91 
2,069 
~6,180 
~13,640 ~24,468 
' 44,283 
~5,926 
~15,O44 ~24,664 
' 45,634 
SALT 
quired by Hardy Salt Co. of Michigan, and Diamond Crystal Salt Co. of Michigan
was sold to Oglebay Norton Co. Olin Corp. closed down its salt well facilities
at Saltville, Va., after many years of chlorine and caustic soda production.
The soda ash plant was closed in 1971. Cargill, Inc. closed its Pawnee Salt
Co. in Kansas and its equipment was transferred to Cãrgill's Gordy
plant at Baldwin, La. 
Table 6.—Pressed.salt blocks sold by original producers of salt in
the United States 
(Thousand short tons and thousand dollars) 
Year 
From evaporated salt 
From rock salt 
Quantity Value 
T 
Quantity 
otal' 
Value 
Quantity Value 
1968                   
1969                   
1970                   
1971                   
1972                   
 357 9,246 369 9,622 368 10,085 367 10,532 376 10,927 
 85 2,321 83 2,852 79 2,269 87 2,095 66 2,138 
442 
452 
447 
454 
442 
11,567 
11,974 
12,353 
12,627 
13,065 
' Data may not add to tot 
ala shown because of lade 
pendent rounding. 
CONSUMPTION AND USES 
(Thousand short tons) 
W Withheld to avoid disclosing individual company confidential data; included
with "Total." ' Data may not add to totals shown because of independent rounding.
' Less than 3~ unit. 
 some exports and consumption in overseas areas administered by the United
States. Differs from totals shown in tables 2,4, and 5 because of changes
in inventory. 5Differs from totals shown in tables 1,2, and 3 because of
changes in inventory. 


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