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Bureau of Mines / Minerals yearbook metals, minerals, and fuels 1972
Year 1972, Volume 1 (1972)

Ryan, J. Patrick
Lead,   pp. 695-725 ff. PDF (3.0 MB)


Page 696

696 MINERALS YEARBOOK, 1972 
Actual drawdown of government stocks during 1972 was 44,738 tons, leaving
a total of 1,085,871 tons remaining in the stockpile on December 31. Of the
total uncommitted inventory at yearend 547,615 tons was in excess of the
530,000-ton objective. 
 GSA concluded contracts in May with primary producers for the disposal of
575,000 tons of surplus stockpile lead. Under terms of the contracts producers
were obligated to purchase metal at the rate of 50,000 tons per year subject
to suspension during quarters when producers' stocks exceed one-tenth of
the preceding year~s shipment of primary metal. The long-term contracts were
amended at yearend by reducing the point of suspension to one-twelfth of
the preceding year's shipments and increasing the purchase requirement to
55,000 tons per year. The new rates were to become effective January 1, 1973.
 A bill (H.R. 16388) ' to provide for an adequate supply of lead and zinc
for consumption in the United States from domestic and foreign sources was
introduced in August and referred to the Committee on Ways and Means. The
bill included a proposal to increase tariffs on lead in impor.ted concentrates,
lead and zinc unwrought and wrought metals, lead and 
zinc waste and scrap, and manufactures of these metals when exceeding specified
urniting quantities. The bill also provided for revising the quotas for lead
and zinc in concert with changes in the annual consumption. The proposed
act was designed to implement the Mining and Minerals Policy Act of 1970
by encouraging private enterprise. No further action was taken on the bill
by the 92d Congress. Bills (S. 3136, H.R. 12958) were introduced in the 
2d Session, 92d Congress to regulate ' the amounts of lead and cadmium that
may be released from glazed ceramic or enamel dinnerware; other ' bills introduced
in the Congress relating to the use of lead included the following: S. 607—which
would reduce the amount of lead contained in lead-based paints for residential
use and establish procedures to minimize hazards of lead-based paint in any
existing housing; H.R. 15937—which would provide performance standards
for emission control devices to reduce air pollution from used vehicles,
which could affect the use of lead in gasoline. The enactment of the Noise
Control Act of 1972, which sets limits on noise emission, could stimulate
the use of lead as a noise suppressing material in construction and other
equipment. 
 On February 23 the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published guidelines
Table 1.—Salient lead statistics 
(Short tons unless otherwise specified) 
1968 
1969 
1970 
1971 
1972 
United States: 
Production: 
Domestic ores, recoverable lead content                         
 Value thousands_ 
Primary lead (refined): 
From domestic ores and base 
359,156 
$94,903 
509,013 
$151,635 
571,767 
$178,609 
578,550 
$159,679 
618,915 
$186,046 
 bullion                
 From foreign ores and base bullion Antimonial lead (primary lead content)
Secondary lead (lead content)       
Exports of lead materials excluding scrap. Imports, general: 
Lead in ore and matte            
Lead in base bullion             
 Leadin pigs, bars, and old        Stocks December 31 (lead content): 
At primary smelters and refineries- - - At consumer plants              
Consumption of metal, primary and secondary                           
Price: Common lead, average, cents per pound'                           
World: 
349,039 
118,271 
19,494 
550,879 
8,281 
87,836 
8 
344,601 
90,427 
78,900 
1,328,790 
13.21 
513,931 
124,724 
16,250 
603,905 
4,968 
109,252 
1,993 
285,342 
101,860 
126,404 
1,389,358 
14.93 
528,086 
138,644 
11,655 
597,390 
7,747 
112,406 
296 
251,480 
192,985 
133,502 
1,360,552 
15.69 
573,022 
76,993 
16,116 
596,797 
5,925 
65,998 
41 
198,970 
121,660 
125,577 
1,431,514 
13.89 
592,658 
103,001 
8,185 
616,597 
8,376 
101,514 
895 
245,625 
145,573 
118,544 
1,485,254 
15.03 
Production: 
Mine                           
Smelter                      
Price: London, common lead, average, cents per pound                  
3,314,992 
3,250,514 
10.88 
3,566,061 
3,553,458 
13.09 
3,741,546 
3,628,422 
13.76 
3,771,879 
3,500,868 
11.52 
3,848,582 
3,725,534 
13.68 
' Quotations for 1968—71 at New York and for 
1972 on a n 
ationwide, d 
elivered basis. 


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