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Bureau of Mines / Minerals yearbook metals, minerals, and fuels 1972
Year 1972, Volume 1 (1972)

Willard, David G.
Graphite,   pp. 589-595 ff. PDF (715.7 KB)


Page 591

 Crystalline Amorphous 2 Total 
Use 
 Quantity Value Quantity Value Quantity Value 
 3,513 $630,356 
 492 88,713 
 1,054 118,070 
 6,815 $786,702 
 9,198 1,366,608 
 7,088 693,837 
10,328 $1,417,058 
9,690 1,455,321 
8,142 811,907 
 4,174 829,944 639 150,661 4,813 980,605 
 1,083 610,062 2,353 726,028 3,436 1,336,090 
 1,251 514,805 771 232,072 2,022 746,877 
 761 349,671 1,042 451,769 1,803 801,440 
 651 268,512 473 240,021 1,124 508,533 
 260 177,139 221 115,876 481 293,015 
 98 57,668 35 26,334 133 84,002 
 114 33,601 92 57,490 206 91,091 
 91 49,713 190 46,105 281 95,818 
 195 128,405 85 61,253 280 189,658 
 81 64,632 105 27,211 186 91,843 
 4,563 795,540 286 136,806 4,849 932,346 
PRICES 
GRAPHITE 
CONSUMPTION AND USES 
591 
 A strong upsurge in consumption of natural graphite in 1972 reflected the
increased output of the metal industry. Demand in most refractory uses and
other mill and smelter applications was signfficandy higher than in the two
previous years. Consumption was up only a little in other uses of natural
graphite. 
 Table 3 excludes the consumption by numerous small consumers. It is estimated
that consumption in 1972, including small consumers, totaled 70,000 tons,
a gain of 15% to 20% above the 1971 total. Most of the increase is estimated
to have been in refractories and steel mill uses. 
Table 8.—Consumption' of natural graphite in the United States in 1972,
by use 
Foundry facings 
Steelmaking 
Refractories 
Crucibles, retorts, stoppers, sleeves, nozzles 
Lubricants3 
Pencils 
Brake linings 
Batteries 
Carbon brushes 
Bearings 
Other mechanical products 
Rubber 
Powdered metals 
Paints and polishes 
Other4____________________ 
(Short tons) 
 Total 18,381 4,716,831 29,393 5,118,773 47,774 9,835,604 
 Consumption data incomplete. Excludes small consuming firms. 
 2lncludes mixtures of natural and manufactured graphite. 
 5 ammunition and packings. 
 Includes antiknock and other compounds, drilling mud, electrical and electronic
products, insulation magnetic tape, small packages, and miscellaneous and
proprietary uses. 
 Domestic price quotations for natural graphite continued unchanged in 1972,
the second successive year of price stability. Price guidelines under Phase
II and the availability of substitute materials together held prices in line.
Such stability could not be maintained in the face of higher prices for imports
and other cost increases, however, and the prices of most graphite rose in
early 1973. 
 Domestic prices, as quoted by the Chemical Marketing Reporter (formerly
Oil, Paint, and Drug Reporter), January 1, 1973, on an exwarehouse basis,
were as follows: 
Per pound 
No. 1 flake graphite, 90% to 95% carbon                       
$0.32$0.42 
No. 2 flake graphite, 90% to 95% carbon                       
.239— .32 
Powdered crystalline graphite: 
88% to 90% carbon          
 90% to 92% carbon          
 95% to 96% carbon        Powdered amorphous graphite    Powdered amorphous
or crystalline graphite, minimum of 97% carbon 
.184— .27 
.255— .275 
.29— .399 
.0626—. 195 
.28— .36 
 Prices of imported crystalline graphite rose during the year, as is shown
by the comparison below of yearend prices, f.o.b. sources, quoted in the
Engineering and Mining Journal (after conversion from metric tons). Factors
causing import prices 


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