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Bureau of Mines / Minerals yearbook metals, minerals, and fuels 1972
Year 1972, Volume 1 (1972)

Klingman, Charles L.
Bromine,   pp. 223-226 PDF (317.6 KB)


Page 224

-224 MINERALS YEARBOOK, 1972 
Table 2.—Bromine compounds sold by primary producers in the United
States 
(Thousand pounds and thousand dollars) 
1971 
1972 
— 
 Quantity 
Gross Bromine 
weight content 
Value 
Quantity 
Gross Bromine 
weight content 
Value 
Ethylene dibromide                 
Methyl bromide                    
Othercompounds'                  
279,191 
 W 
105,132 
237,508 
 W 
75,804 
44,126 
 W 
45,926 
316,603 
24,683 
84,962 
269,334 
20,768 
58,934 
49,325 
8,381 
39,770 
Total                       
384,323 
313,312 
90,052 
426,248 
349,036 
97,476 
W Withheld to avoid disclosing individual company confidential data; included
with "Other compounds." 1 Includes ammonium, sodium, potassium, ethyl, and
other bromides. 
Table 3.—Domestic bromine producers 
State 
Company 
County 
Plant 
Production 
source 
Arkansas        
Arkansas Chemicals, Inc 
Bromet Co  
The Dow Chemical Co 
Great Lakes Chemical 
 Union         Columbia      
 do            Union         
El Dorado  Magnolia       
 do       El Dorado      
Well brines. 
 Do. 
 Do. 
 Do. 
California       
Corp. 
Michigan Chemical Corp Kerr-McGee Chemical 
 do            San Bernardino - 
 do       Trona         
 Do. 
Searles Lake 
Michigan        
Corp. 
The Dow Chemical Co~ 
 do            
Michigan- Chemical Corp 
Morton Chemical Co - - 
Mason         
Midland       
Gratiot.       
Manistee       
Ludington      
Midland       
St. Louis       
Manistee       
brines. 
Well brines. 
 Do. 
 Do. 
 Do. 
seven companies. Two of these plants extracted elemental bromine only for
sale and did not produce compounds. In addi 
lion, other plants, not shown in -table 3, made compounds only from purchased
bromine. 
CONSUMPTION AND USES 
 The Bureau of Mines has not surveyed the consumers of bromine and bromine
compounds for many years and therefore does not have 1972 data on the final
disposition of these products. It was known, however, that over 74% of U.S.
production in 1972 went to the manufacture of ethylene dibromide. Most of
this production was used in gasoline additives, but the compound was also
used in agriculture and as a solvent. In 1971 there was great pessimism over
the future of ethylene dibromide because of the Clean Air Act of 1970, which
required a 90% reduction in harmful emissions from automobile exhausts by
the year 1975. This pessimism, however, was apparently not justified by actual
conditions because, in 1972, the industry rebuilt depleted inventories and
de 
veloped new markets for bromine compounds. 
 The use of bromine in the manufacture of flame retardants was also believed
to be on the increase. It was estimated that between 3% and 4% of total bromine
production went into the manufacture of flame retardan-ts in 1972. 
 Agricultural chemicals also increased, but the extent of the increase was
not known. Methyl bromide was classed primarily as an agricultural chemical
because of its extended use as a soil sterilant and insect fumigant. Many
of the agricultural chemicals were proprietary, and their exact composition
was not widely known. 
 Elemental bromine was utilized as a disinfectant, algaecide, and as an oxidizing
intermediate in the manufacture of other chemicals. 


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