University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Ecology and Natural Resources Collection

Page View

Bureau of Mines / Minerals yearbook area reports: domestic 1972
Year 1972, Volume 2 (1972)

Sutton, Joseph A.
Ohio,   pp. 533-548 PDF (1.6 MB)


Page 533

 
Table l.—Mineral production 
in Ohio' 
1971 
1972 
Mineral 
Quantity 
Value 
(thousands) 
Quantity 
 Value (thousands) 
Cement: 
 Portland ~thousand short tons... 
 Masonry do~.__ 
2,897 
 142 
3.973 
51,431 
NA 
4,007 
79,903 
6 
8,286 
5,709 
40,797 
46,891 
XX 
$54,338 
3,811 
11,380 
269,601 
8 
65.258 
27.007 
84 
29,801 
46,651 
54,044 
88,872 
1,796 
2,968 
 161 
4,125 
50,967 
 NA 
4,418 
89.995 
4 
9,358 
6,147 
43,506 
48,498 
XX 
$57,953 
4,684 
11.273 
303,819 
8 
75,569 
35,271 
67 
85,179 
47,710 
59,982 
90,821 
2,462 
Clays do....Coal (bituminous) do...... 
Gem stones - 
Lime thousand short tons...Natural gas million cubic feet...Peat thousand
short tons_. 
Petroleum (crude) 42-gallon barrels..Salt thousand short tons...Sand and
gravel do...Stone do_~ 
Value of items that cannot be disclosed: 
 Abrasive stone and gypsum - 
Total -Total 1967 constant dollars - 
XX 
XX 
652,151 
554,524 
XX 
XX 
724,748 P 602,918 
P Preliminary. - NA Not available. XX Not applicable. 
' Production as measured by mine shipments, sales, or marketable production
(including consumption by producers). 
  533The Mineral Industry of Ohio 
By Joseph A. Sutton1 
 Ohio's 1972 record-setting mineral production, valued at $724.7 million,
was dominated by increased values for cement, coal, lime, natural gas, petroleum,
and sand and gravel. These commodities accounted for 74% of the $72.6 million
increase over the 
1971 total. Mineral production was reported in all of the State's 88 counties
except Fulton. Harrison and Muskingum Counties with mineral output values
of $50 million and $41 million respectively, were the State's leading mineral-producing
areas. The ever-growing National and State markets for such energy and construction
materials as oil, natural gas, clay, cement, stone, and sand and gravel stimulated
gains in Ohio mineral production. Nationally, the State continued to be an
important producer of bituminous coal, stone, lime, salt, and clay. 
 Employment and Injuries—Final 1971 statistics and preliminary data
for 1972 on employment and injuries in the mineral industry, excluding the
petroleum industry. are given in table 4. 
 Legislation and Government Programs.— A gas well owner's production
statement law 
was passed by the Ohio Senate and became 
effective July 14, 1972. The new law, which 
amended substitute Senate Bill 387, requires 
a gas well owner, upon request of the 
royalty interest holder of a well, to furnish to the royalty holder a statement
of the volume of gas produced by the well. The purpose of the law was to
give the owner of land upon which a gas well is located a means of ascertaining
the amount of gas that a producer obtained from his land, in order to determine
whether the producer paid royalties on all gas produced. 
 Amended House Bill 94 extended the date for prohibition q~ oil and gas drilling
from or under the bed of Lake Erie to July 1, 1974. 
 The passage of amended substitute Senate Bill 397 created a state Environmental
Protection Agency (EPA); assigned the EPA Director powers and duties for
administering the laws governing air pollution, solid waste disposal, public
water supply, disposal and treatment of sewage and industrial planning; provided
for citizen participation in EPA proceedings; created an Environmental Board
of Review to hear appeals from actions of the Director; and created a Power
Siting Commission to approve the location, and emission and discharge requirements
of powerplants and electric and gas transmission lines. 
1 Physical scientist, Division of Ferrous Metals 
—Mineral Supply. 


Go up to Top of Page