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Bureau of Mines / Minerals yearbook area reports: domestic 1972
Year 1972, Volume 2 (1972)

Cooper, Franklin D.
Pennsylvania,   pp. 577-628 PDF (5.9 MB)


Page 577

  577The Mineral Industry of 
Pennsylvania 
 This chapter has been prepared by the Bureau of Mines, U.S. Department of
the Interior, and the Pennsylvania Bureau of Topographic and Geologic Survey,
Department of Environmental Resources, under a cooperative agreement for
collecting information covering the mineral production from mines, quarries,
and wells. 
By Franklin D. Cooper' 
Pennsylvania mineral production reached a record output value of $1,231.5
million, $82.4 million above that of 1971. Increases in value were attained
by cement, clays, bituminous coal, lime, natural gas, sand and gravel, and
stone. Output value decreases were noted for anthracite, copper, iron ore
pellets, peat, crude petroleum, and zinc. The value of all natural gas liquids
was 34% greater than 1971. 
Compared with 1971 figures, the average f.o.b. mine value of anthracite increased
14 cents per ton and that of bituminous coal advanced 63 cents per ton. Collectively,
solid-fuels production accounted for 63.3% of the total value of mineral
production, and the value of all fossil fuels equaled 66.5% of total mineral
production value. 
The production of anthracite was 18.6% 
less and its value was 17.6% less than in 
1971. Bituminous coal production was 4.3% 
greater and its value was 11.9% greater 
than in 1971. 
Leading mineral producing counties, with primary commodities in parentheses,
were Washington, Greene, Indiana, Armstrong and Cambria (bituminous coal),
Northampton and Lawrence (cement), and Schuylkill (anthracite). Cameron,
and Pike Counties reported no mineral production. Pennsylvania led the Nation
in stone production and was second in cement, third in lime and coal, and
fourth in tripoli. 
 1 Physical scientist, Division of Fossil Fuels— Mineral Supply. 
Table 1.—Mineral production in Pennsylvania 1 
1971 
1972 
Value 
Value 
Mineral 
Quantity (thousands) 
Quantit 
y (thousands) 
Cement: 
 Portland thousand short tons_... 
 Masonry do_._. 
Clays do__U 
Coal: 
7,850 
 419 
22,325 
$140,460 
11,247 
2 8,940 
8,214 
451 
2,682 
$156,008 
12,401 
15,829 
 Anthracite do____ 
 Bituminous do____ 
Copper (recoverable content of ores, etc.)_short tons-Gem stones        
8,727 
72,835 
3,349 
 NA 1,760 
76,451 
 88 
103,469 
620,196 
 3,483 
9 
30,008 
20,770 
 461 
7,106 
75,939 
2,611 NA 
1,891 
73,958 
 22 
85,251 
694,267 
 2,673 
9 
33,802 
22,389 
 320 
Lime thousand short tons__Natural gas million cubic feet__ 
Peat thousand short tons__ 
Petroleum (crude)     thousand 42-gallon barrels__ 
Sand and gravel          thousand short tons__ 
Stone                          do___. 
Zinc (recoverable content of ores, etc.)__short tons__ 
Value of items that cannot be disclosed: 
3,798 
19,668 
64,467 
27,438 
17,699 
36,162 
118,469 
8,835 
3,441 
18,757 
67,307 
18,344 
16,414 
36,804 
124,340 
6,512 
Clays (kaolin) (1971), cobalt (1971), gold (1971), iron ore, scrap mica,
pyrites (1971), silver (1971), tripoli, and natural gas liquids         
XX 
28,899 
XX 
24,466 
Total                           
XX 
1,149,107 
XX 
1,231,485 
Total 1967 constant dollars             
XX 
977,086 
XX 
P 1,024,472 
 P Preliminary. NA Not available. XX Not applicable. 
 1 Production as measured by mine shipments, sales, or marketable production
(including consumption by producers). 
2 kaolin; included with "Value of items that cannot be disclosed," 


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