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Bureau of Mines / Minerals yearbook area reports: domestic 1972
Year 1972, Volume 2 (1972)

Kuklis, Andrew
Colorado,   pp. 145-172 PDF (2.7 MB)


Page 145

  145The Mineral Industry of Colorado 
By Andrew Kuklisl 
 Mineral output in Colorado for 1972 was valued at $426 million, 8% more
than in 1971. Most notable was a $22 million increase in the value of mineral
fuels, principally coal, natural gas, and petroleum. Increases in the values
of gold, lead, molybdenum, silver, and zinc more than offset losses in iron
ore, tin, tungsten, uranium, and vanadium. 
 The State ranked first in the nation in output of molybdenum and tin, and
was second in fluorspar, tungsten, and vanadium. 
 Thirty-two mineral commodities, one less than in 1971, were produced in
1972. Of these, 14 were classed as nonmetals, 12 as metals, and 6 as fuels.
The metals coin- 
pnised 40% of the total mineral value, fuels 40%, and nonmetals 20%. Based
on value, the leading commodity in each group was molybdenum, petroleum,
and cement, respectively. 
 Within the metal group, five of the commodities increased in value and seven
declined compared with 1971 figures. All mineral fuels showed increases.
Nine of the nonmetals had increased in value and six had losses. 
 Nineteen of the 32 commodities produced had output valued at over $1 million;
9 had values exceeding $10 million. 
 1 engineer, Bureau of Mines, Division 
of Ferrous Metals—Mineral Supply. 
Table 1.—Mineral production in Colorado' 
1971 
1972 
'  
Value 
Value 
Mineral 
Quantity 
(thou- 
sands) 
Quan- 
tity 
(thousands) 
Clays thousand short tons~Coal (bituminous) do____ 
Copper (recoverable content of ores, etc.) 
625 
5,387 
$1,334 
33,813 
747 
5,522 
$1,533 
35,687 
 short tons__Feldspar do____ 
3,938 p571 NA 
4,096 
 4 
125 
3,944 
 W 
NA 
4,039 
 W 
131 
Gem stones                               Gold (recoverable content of ores,
etc.) 
 troy ounces__ Lead (recoverable content of ores, etc.) 
42,031 
1,734 
61,000 
3,580 
 short tons__Lime thousand short tons__Mica, sheet thousand pounds__Natural
gas million cubic feet__Natural gas liquids: 
25,746 
 193 
 8,300 
108,537 
7,106 
3,039 
4 
16,932 
31,346 
187 
14,280 
116,949 
9,423 
4,070 
7 
19,297 
Natural gasoline and cycle products 
 thousand 42-gallon barrebs_ LP gases                            do___ 
929 
1,653 
28 
2,462 
3,190 
156 
1,245 
1,749 
39 
3,349 
3,673 
210 
Peat thousand short tons__ 
Petroleum (crude) ~thousand 42-gallon barrels_.. Pumice                 
thousand short tons__ 
27,391 
62 
27,000 
3,390 
3,785 
92,855 
W 
30,155 
5,241 
7,933 
32,015 
59 
28,318 
3,664 
4,507 
109,171 
W 
34,631 
 6,174 
 9,599 
Sand and gravel do____ 
Silver (recoverable content of ores, etc.) 
 thousand troy ounces__Stone thousand short tons.._ 
Uranium (recoverable content UsOs) 
 thousand pounds__ Zinc (recoverable content of ores, etc.)__short tons__
Value of items that cannot be disclosed: 
2,536 
61,181 
15,725 
19,700 
1,877 
63,801 
11,825 
22,649 
Beryllium concentrate, carbon dioxide, cement, 
fluorspar, gypsum, iron ore, mica (scrap) (1971), 
molybdenum, penlite, pyrites, salt, tin, tungsten 
concentrate vanadium, and values indicated by the 
symbol W                              
XX 
147,117 
XX 
146,843 
Total                               Total 1967 constant dollars         
XX 
XX 
392,721 
333,931 
XX 
XX 
425,841 P 354,257 
 P Preliminary. Revised. NA Not available. W Withheld to avoid disclosing
individual company confidential data; included with ' Value of items that
cannot be disclosed." XX Not applicable. 
 ' P~~eduction as measured by mine shipments, sales, or marketable production
(including consumption by producers). 


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