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Bureau of Mines / Minerals yearbook metals, minerals, and fuels 1972
Year 1972, Volume 1 (1972)

Morning, John L.
Chromium,   pp. 289-299 ff. PDF (1.1 MB)


Page 289

 
Chromite, chemical-grade                      
Chromite, refractory-grade                  
Chromite, metallurgical-grade                
Ferrocbromiuin, high-carbon                 
Ferrochromiuin, low-carbon                  
Ferrochromium-silicon                     
250 
368 
2,911 
71 
- - 
544 
991 
332 
126 
128 
26 
- - 
- - 
901 
- - 
- - 
- - 
910 
1.1.9 
1,556 
403 
319 
59 
Chromium metal                         
4 
1 
- - 
8 
Total 
  289Chromium 
By John L. Morning' 
 Technologic change in the manufacture of stainless steel during the past
several years brought about increasing use of lower cost high-carbon ferrochromium
in place of higher cost low-carbon ferrochromium. Although the domestic chro
mium alloy producers maintained their production pace of the previous year,
increasing demand for chromium alloys was met by imports, which rose to a
record high of 141,000 tons. 
Table 1.—Salient chromite statistics 
(Thousand short tons) 
1968 
1969 
1970 
1971 
1972 
United States: 
 Exports - Reexports                              Imports for consumption
                 Consumption                         
Stocks Dec. 31: Consumer  
World: Production                          
13 
126 
1,084 
1,316 
912 
5,444 
49 
150 
1,106 
1,411 
675 
5,865 
41 
73 
1,405 
1,403 
733 
6,672 
35 
145 
1,299 
1,093 
1,019 
6,908 
20 
57 
1,061 
1,140 
857 
6,841 
 Legislation and Government Programs. 
—An amendment to Public Law 92—156 
(section 503) allowed the importation of strategic and critical materials
from Southern Rhodesia in 1972, -and the Department of Treasury published
regulations removing controls on these materials.2 Various congressional
efforts were made during the year to nullify section 503, but both the House
and Senate rejected plans to reinstall the embargo. A Federal suit by some
congressional members to reinstate the embargo was rejected by the court.
 Government chromium stockpile material inventories and objectives are shown
in 
table 2. Included in the inventories is material sold but unshipped. This
includes chemical-grade chromite, 341,680 tons; metallurgical-grade chromite,
116,906 torts; and refractory-grade chromite, 6,172 tons. 
 General Services Administration (GSA) under various disposal programs offered
for sale all three grades of chromite either by competitive bidding or by
negotiated sales. Sales were as follows: Chemical-grade chromite, 1,796 tons,
and refractory-grade 
 1 Supervisory physical scientist, Division of Ferrous Metals. 
 2 Federal Register. V. 37, No. 16, Jan. 25, 
1972. 
Table 2.—U.S. Government chromium stockpile material inventories and
objectives 
(Thousand short tons) 
Inventory by program, Dec. 31, 1972 
 Objective National Defense  Supple- 
stockpile Production mental 
  Act stockpile 
366 
178 
323 
277 
191 
33 
7 


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