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Bureau of Mines / Minerals yearbook metals, minerals, and fuels 1972
Year 1972, Volume 1 (1972)

Schroeder, Harold J.
Copper,   pp. 473-509 ff. PDF (3.8 MB)


Page 473

Table 1.—Salient copper statistics 
 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 
United States: 
 Ore produced      thousand short tons. 170,054 223,752 257,729 242,656 266,831
    Average yield of copper __percent - - - 0.60 0.60 0.59 0.55 0.55 
 Primary (new) copper produced— 
From domestic ores, as reported by— Mines            shorttons. 1,204,621
1,544,579 1,719,657 1,522,183 1,664,840 
 Value thousands$1,008,195 $1,468,400 $1,984,484 $1,583,071 $1,704,796 Smelters
         shorttons 1,234,724 1,547,496 1,605,265 1,470,815 1,649,130 
 % of world total 20 24 24 22 23 
 1,437,386 1,742,815 1,765,094 1,591,782 1,873,233 
 520,772 574,890 504,071 445,157 458,194 
 313,741 241,254 273,577 262,838 241,600 
 240,745 200,269 221,211 187,654 182,743 
 709,975 413,860 392,480 359,479 
 400,278 131,171 132,143 163,988 
415,611 
192,379 
 48,000 39,000 130,000 75,000 57,000 
 272,000 291,000 
 320,000 330,000 
 6,223,820 6,638,042 6,653,048 7,313,536 
 6,413,940 6,751,531 6,739,404 7,300,429 
 66.24 62.96 48.49 48.53 
  473Copper 
By Harold J. Schroeder1 
 World mine production of copper increased 10% to 7.31 million tons, a record
high for the -fifth consecutive year. The increase was broadly shared by
almost all major producing countries. A number of new mine projects, notably
in Papua New Guinea, Western -Canada, Indonesia, the Republic of South Africa,
and Zaire came onstream during the year. 
 In the United States, mine, smelter, and refinery outputs increased substantially
from the strike-curtailed level of 1971 with smelter and refinery outputs
from primary 
materials at record high quantities. Consumption of refined copper also increased
significantly to the largest quantity since the record high of 1966. Foreign
trade in unmanufactured copper was characterized by an increase in imports
and a decline in exports. Changing market conditions were reflected in a
price increase of 2¼ cents in February and a decrease of 2 cents in
July for a yearend quotation of 50V2 to 50% cents per pound for electrolytic
wirebar copper. - 
 1 Physical scientist, Division of Nonferrous Metals—Mineral Supply.
 Refineries short tons - 1,160,925 
From foreign ores, matte, etc., as re 
 ported by refineries do _ 276,461 
Total new refined, domestic and 
 foreign do~.. 
Secondary copper recovered from old scrap 
  only do~ 
 Exports: 
    Metalliccopper do~ 
    Refined do~. 
 Imports, general: 
    Unmanufactured do - - - 
    Refined do~ 
Stocks Dec. 31: Producers: 
 Refined do~ 
Blister and materials in solution 
 Total do.. 
Withdrawals (apparent) from total supply on domestic account: 
 Primary copper do - - - 1,576,000 
Primary and old copper (old scrap 
 only) do. 2,097,000 
 Price: Weighted average, cents per poun& - 42.2 
World: 
Production: 
 Mine short tons... 5,640,921 
 Smelter do 6,050,822 
 Price: London, average cents per pound .~. - 56.13 
 1,468,889 1,521,183 1,410,523 1,680,412 
 273,926 243,911 181,259 192,821 
 340,000 303,000 281,000 
 470,000 378,000 338,000 
 1,683,000 1,585,000 1,623,000 1,901,000 
 2,258,000 2,089,000 2,068,000 2,359,000 
 47.9 58.2 52.0 51.2 


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